Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Cutting school funding is not an appropriate solution to balance state budgets

May 15, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

As many states face budget shortfalls due to the impacts of the pandemic, experts at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities write of the importance of continuing to strive for equitable education and K-12 funding. Before the pandemic began, fifteen U.S. states—including New Hampshire and Rhode Island—had been sued over their inadequate or inequitable school funding. Cuts to school funding were a prominent strategy used to balance state budgets during the Great Recession and may be used again in this crisis. Experts warn of the consequences of these measures besides additional lawsuits—a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that for every 10 percent of funding that was cut due to the Great Recession, graduation rates decreased by 2.6 percentage points. #covid-19 #education

COVID-19 crisis complicates access to behavioral health providers in rural places

May 14, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth, Families

The COVID-19 crisis has had a ripple effect on many aspects of the health care system, including mental and behavioral health providers. Rural areas were already seriously underserved, but getting treatment is becoming even more difficult as clinics close or move to telehealth. Those who do have access to providers may avoid facilities for fear of being exposed to the virus. A facility in Kentucky is working to supplement direct, in-person appointments. Through social distancing and no-contact protocols, they are allowing patients to use the facility’s own computers for telehealth check-ins with other healthcare providers. This fills an important gap, as many in the area do not have home broadband. #covid-19 #mentalhealth #rural

Children experiencing poverty will likely face long-term impacts of current crisis

May 13, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Experts at Brookings remind readers that the 16 percent of children growing up in poverty in the United States might never be able to recover from the economic shock of the pandemic. Financial distress and toxic stress in the early years have long-term negative consequences, and disruptions in emotional and social development will be harmful for both young children and adolescents. One of the significant lessons learned from previous economic crises is that fear and uncertainty about the future can damage family and child well-being independent of the visible economic impacts of a crisis. #covid-19 #mentalhealth

Using Culturally Responsive Practices to Foster Learning During School Closures: Challenges and Opportunities for Equity

May 10, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth, Families

An article from the Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic suggests that the shift to remote K-12 education provides a unique opportunity to increase the connection between schools and families, which can be leveraged to engage in culturally responsive practices. #covid-19 #education

Even before the pandemic many low-income students faced limited technology access

May 8, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Using data from the nationally representative Understanding America Study, researchers from the University of California explored issues of student access to technology. The researchers found that 85% of families with at least one school-aged child had access to the internet and a home computer, although rates were much lower (63%) among families earning $25,000 or less per year. The researchers note that children in these families may still have access to technology through tablets, smartphones, or public WiFi, but that the quality of their educational experience likely differs from those among their higher income peers. #covid-19 #education

California school districts prepare for increased mental health service demands

May 7, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Children will be differentially impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, but many will need additional mental health supports. The Los Angeles Times reports that for many K-12 students, school is the only place where they have access to mental health services. Most public schools will not have enough counselors and social workers to meet the increased demand once students return to campus and expected budget cuts will make expanding these services difficult. California school districts are providing what they can in the short term, including checkins with students, mental health hotlines, and training teachers in mindfulness and stress reduction. #covid-19 #mentalhealth

More federal relief needed for elementary and secondary education

May 7, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Brookings scholars draw on elementary and secondary education policy outcomes from the Great Recession to inform their recommendations for COVID-19 federal relief programs. The 2020 CARES Act appropriated $16.2 billion to education relief, which is far lower than the $56.5 billion allocated during the Great Recession. Their analysis shows that even this larger 2009 package “only delayed substantial declines in spending for elementary and secondary education for two or three years, and the COVID-19 crisis is expected to hit state revenues even harder.” Authors argue that more federal relief will be needed. #covid-19 #education

Supporting young workers is crucial to economic recovery

May 7, 2020 – Older Youth

A new report from Brookings experts covers the importance of supporting young workers—millions of whom were already among the most economically vulnerable before the pandemic. Many do not have a college degree and work in the industries hit hardest by coronavirus shutdowns. Less experience and lower levels of education likely mean these young workers will have difficulty finding new employment if they lose their job. Expanding service programs aimed at young adults—such as YouthBuild, AmeriCorps, and other models—could be influential in providing new opportunities. Additionally, federal initiatives could hire workers to provide services related to the pandemic relief effort. #covid-19 #workforce See related bill in the Senate put forth by Chris Coons (D-DE) proposing to increase AmeriCorps enrollment and stipends: https://www.coons.senate.gov/news/pressreleases/sen-coons-colleagues-introduce-legislation-to-significantly-expand-nationalservice-programs-to-respond-to-covid-19

With pandemic comes significant mental health impact on young adults

May 7, 2020 – Older Youth

Although many experts have expressed concern about the expected adverse mental health outcomes the pandemic may trigger, concrete statistics have been scarce until recently. A survey conducted on April 27, 2020 by a San Diego State University researcher found that the pandemic has had particularly damaging mental health impacts on young adults and all those ages 18 – 44. #covid-19 #mentalhealth

School district capacity, resources do not determine remote learning engagement

May 6, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Brookings researchers report that many of the differences among school districts’ remote learning efforts are not due to capacity alone. A recent study of 82 school districts from the Center on Reinventing Public Education found that only 44 percent are providing online instruction and monitoring students’ progress. Some of the school districts in low-resource communities, like Los Angeles County and Miami-Dade County, have had successful transitions to daily remote learning. Consistent expectations and accountability have been key to keeping students engaged. Other more affluent districts, such as in Seattle, have lagged in setting up remote learning and the lack of accountability has resulted in many students not participating at all. #covid-19 #education

Pandemic motivates states to reduce the number of youths in juvenile justice facilities

May 5, 2020 – Older Youth

According to Pew Trusts, states are taking seriously the risks of the virus for youth confined in juvenile justice facilities by aiming to reduce confined populations. The author notes that these shifts are inspired by the pandemic but align with the newest available public safety research findings that confinement doesn’t necessarily reduce recidivism. Specific strategies for reducing the correctional population include identifying lower-risk youth for community release (as in Michigan and California), releasing those who have almost completed their sentence (as in Illinois and New York), and releasing those who have served at least 90 days (as in Mississippi). #covid-19

Rural, black, and Native youth disconnected from alternative education programming

May 1, 2020 – Older Youth

A new article from Pew Trusts Stateline highlights the challenges of the pandemic for disconnected youth, with focus on rural, black, and Native youth. For those who were tenuously connected to alternative education and skill-building program, socially distanced versions of programming may not be enough to keep them connected, especially considering infrastructure and financial barriers around virtual learning. #covid-19 #education #rural