Resource Library

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country.

The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

We invite you to check back often, as this list is regularly updated.

 

Health and Well-Being of First Place-Involved Youth

December 20, 2019 – Older Youth

This brief is the fourth in the series commissioned by the John T. Gorman Foundation and focuses on the health and well-being of youth in the study. It follows briefs that describe First Place participants’ experiences with housing stability, employment, and education. The first three briefs showed that factors related to health and well-being influence the extent to which youth experiencing homelessness can achieve stability. This brief provides additional information on the mental health and well-being of study youth and how they affect outcomes in other domains. *JTGF-funded

Extending Medicaid After Childbirth Could Reduce Maternal Deaths

December 13, 2019 – Families, Young Children

Nationwide, drug overdoses, suicides and pregnancy-related chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure are contributing to a rise in deaths among women during pregnancy, childbirth and the first 12 months after delivery. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 out of 5 of those deaths could be prevented with adequate medical attention. But Medicaid pregnancy coverage, which pays for nearly half of all births in the United States, expires 60 days after childbirth, leaving many women without health insurance at one of the most vulnerable times in their lives. This article from Pew Charitable Trusts looks at the effects of extending that coverage a year or more after the end of a pregnancy.

Whole Family Approach to Jobs: Lessons From the Field

December 13, 2019 – Families

The National Conference of States Legislatures (NCSL) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Administration for Children and Families Region 1 Office (ACF) formed an uncommon partnership in 2017. Its goal was to help leaders in the New England states improve family well-being while also increasing economic security through employment. Two years later, the six states have identified state and regional priorities and are working independently and together to address them through legislative action, gubernatorial leadership, state agency reforms and public-private partnerships.

2019 Education Indicators for Maine

December 13, 2019 – Older Youth, Young Children

Of all our economic development strategies, education is the one with the greatest return on investment. Investment in the education of Maine people creates lifelong learners, opens pathways to promising careers, and produces civically engaged citizens. Educate Maine's annual Education Indicators report is a trusted, nonpartisan resource developed to better understand Maine’s entire education system—early childhood through postsecondary. Our focus is on the ten Indicators we have identified which we believe best measure Maine’s educational performance. The ten Indicators that we measure follow the path of each Maine child as he or she grows and learns. The Foundation contributed funding for this report. *JTGF-funded

From Pipelines to Place-Based Strategies for Maine's Older Youth

October 30, 2019 – Older Youth

There are currently 174,500 youth aged 14-24 who are transitioning to adulthood in Maine. Approximately 1,300 Maine youth are experiencing homelessness, 9,400 are disconnected from school, 8,200 are receiving behavioral health services, 13,400 are involved with the child welfare system, and 2,600 are involved with the juvenile justice system.In order to reduce these numbers and develop the best continuum of care for Maine youth, there must be a better understanding of the factors that are occurring within Maine communities. This knowledge is critical to implement the recommendations in the first report of this series, Place Matters: Aligning Investments in a Community-Based Continuum of Care for Maine Youth Transitioning to Adulthood. To help guide and inform the implementation of that first report’s recommendations, this report addresses data resources. It presents data snapshots of the all sixteen counties in Maine for a number of measures that are related to system involvement. The John T. Gorman Foundation provided funding for this report. *JTGF-funded

ACEs and counter-ACEs: How positive and negative childhood experiences influence adult health

October 29, 2019 – Young Children, Older Youth

Numerous studies over the past two decades have found a link between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and worse adult health outcomes. Less well understood is how advantageous childhood experiences (counter-ACEs) may lead to better adult health, especially in the presence of adversity. Published in the Child Abuse and Neglect International Journal, this study from Brigham Young University concludes that counter-ACEs protect against poor adult health and lead to better adult wellness. When ACEs scores are moderate, counter-ACEs largely neutralize the negative effects of ACEs on adult health. Ultimately, the results demonstrate that a public health approach to promoting positive childhood experiences may promote better lifelong health.

Measuring Student Poverty: Dishing Up Alternatives to Free and Reduced-Price Lunch

October 29, 2019 – Families, Older Youth, Young Children

For decades, state policymakers and researchers have used receipt of free and reduced-price lunch as a way to estimate student poverty, but changes to the program have made it a less reliable proxy. This is in large part because of the expanded use of the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP), which provides free lunch to all students in qualifying schools and districts. An accurate count is critical for distributing funding and assessing achievement gaps, so some states use other measures, looking only at participation in safety net programs or using census estimates. This tracker from Urban Institute shows how each state estimates its share of low-income students for funding and accountability purposes and what share of students were enrolled in CEP schools.

Labor force nonparticipation: Trends, causes, and policy solutions

October 29, 2019 – Families

For more than a decade, The Hamilton Project has offered evidence-based policy proposals on a variety of topics that often have important implications for labor force participation. This report discusses these proposals as they relate to the goal of increasing participation, with a special focus on the barriers to increased participation, including weak aggregate demand, low demand for non-college-educated workers, geographic gaps in participation, caregiving responsibilities, health and disability, and criminal justice.

Examining Civic Engagement Links to Health

October 29, 2019 – Families

The authors of this report seek a closer focus on the causal relationship between civic engagement and health and well-being — that is, whether better health and well-being might promote more civic engagement, whether civic engagement might promote health or well-being, or perhaps both. In this report, authors conduct a structured review to understand what the scientific literature presents about the empirical relationship between health and civic engagement. The authors specifically examine whether health is a cause of civic engagement, a consequence of it, or both; what causal mechanisms underlie this link; and where there are gaps in knowledge for the field.

What Works for Job Training Programs for Disadvantaged Workers

October 29, 2019 – Families, Older Youth

The Office of Workforce Development (OWD) in New Orleans, Louisiana, with a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, implemented Career Pathways, an innovative program designed to increase the local talent pool and help lower-skilled, unemployed, and underemployed individuals train for work in growing fields. RAND Corporation researchers evaluated the program to find out whether it was succeeding in its mission: helping trainees learn industry-valued skills and find related jobs. The research team also examined the broader costs and benefits of the program in relation to the city of New Orleans. The team found that the New Orleans Career Pathways program produced meaningful positive results in several areas. These included individuals' wage growth, job satisfaction, and the government's and society's return on investment. There were also areas that had no significant change, such as arrest rates and the duration of individuals' employment.

Balancing Work with School and Training while Raising Young Children

October 29, 2019 – Families

Parents who have children at a young age often face an interruption in their schooling, their plans for career training, and overall life trajectory. But a growing number of young parents are seeking education and training to achieve better opportunities for their families, and many work while attending school. In this report, Urban Institute uses the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education to examine the prevalence of children born to young parents (under age 25) who are currently working while in education or training, the characteristics of these children and their families, and the implications for child care when young parents balance work with advancing their skills and education to get ahead. The reports finds that although children with young parents balancing work with education or training constitute a small share of the child population, they are more likely than all children under 13 to live in low-income households, have single parents, and have parents with lower levels of education. Their parents spend long hours at work, education, or training, including during nontraditional hours. These children are more likely to be in nonparental care, especially the care of unpaid relatives, and to be in that care for more hours than children whose parents only work. The median child care burden for these families is 14 percent—twice the federal government recommendation that child care cost no more than 7 percent of household income. Findings highlight the unique situations of young student-parents who may need greater support and resources to access and pay for child care than they currently have.

Applying the Research and Evaluation Provisions of the Family First Prevention Services Act

October 29, 2019 – Families, Older Youth, Young Children

The federal Family First Prevention Services Act of 2018 (Family First Act) has changed the landscape of federal child welfare funding in significant ways to support children to remain safely in their homes and encourage family-based placement when foster care placement is necessary. With specific requirements around evidence-based programs and tools, the legislation expands opportunities to use research and data to drive decision making and direct funding to ensure that children and families receive the most effective services. This brief from Child Trends outlines these research and evaluation requirements and highlights next steps for state agencies, legislators, and researchers to achieve the Family First Act’s goals.