Resource Library

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The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Maine Kids Count Data Book

March 13, 2015 – Young Children

Since 1994, the Maine KIDS COUNT project has published the annual Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book using the most recent data available on the well-being of children in the areas of physical and emotional health, social and economic status, and child care and education.

The National Summer Learning Association

March 13, 2015 – Young Children

The National Summer Learning Association is the only national nonprofit exclusively focused on closing the achievement gap by increasing access to high-quality summer learning opportunities. NSLA recognizes and disseminates what works in summer learning, develops and delivers capacity-building offerings and convenes and empowers key actors to embrace summer learning as a solution for equity and excellence in education.

National Association for the Education of Young Children

March 13, 2015 – Young Children

NAEYC promotes high-quality early learning for all children, birth through age 8, by connecting practice, policy, and research. We advance a diverse, dynamic early childhood profession and support all who care for, educate, and work on behalf of young children.

The Assets and Opportunity Score Card for Maine

March 13, 2015 – General –

The Assets & Opportunity Scorecard is a comprehensive look at Americans' financial security today and their opportunities to create a more prosperous future. It assesses the 50 states and the District of Columbia on 135 outcome and policy measures, which describe how well residents are faring and what states can do to help them build and protect assets.

National Center for Children in Poverty

March 13, 2015 – General –

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) is one of the nation’s leading public policy centers dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income families and children. NCCP uses research to inform policy and practice with the goal of ensuring positive outcomes for the next generation. They promote family-oriented solutions at the state and national levels.

A Demographic Profile of Maine: Highlighting the Distribution of Vulnerable Populations

March 13, 2015 – General –

This report is the first in a series of three reports commissioned by the John T. Gorman Foundation to assist in informing its strategic planning process. As the first in the collection, this paper aims to provide an overall sense of Maine’s demographic makeup, with an eye toward identifying particular regions in the state that may be considered “disadvantaged.”

National Campaign for Grade Level Reading

March 11, 2015 – Young Children

The Campaign is a collaborative effort by foundations, nonprofit partners, business leaders, government agencies, states and communities across the nation to ensure that more children in low-income families succeed in school and graduate prepared for college, a career, and active citizenship. The Campaign focuses on an important predictor of school success and high school graduation — grade-level reading by the end of third grade.

Building a Collaborative Community Response to Aging in Place

October 29, 2013 – Seniors

Prepared for the John T. Gorman Foundation, the purpose of this paper is to outline a framework to support building aging friendly communities within Maine’s cities, towns, and neighborhoods that enable us to address the challenges associated with aging while at the same time recognizing and embracing the opportunities this age group affords us. *JTGF-funded

Two Generations, One Future: moving parents and children beyond poverty together

March 13, 2013 – Families

Ascend at the Aspen Institute was launched with catalytic support from a core circle of investors with the mission to serve as a hub for breakthrough ideas and proven strategies that move parents, especially women, and their children beyond poverty toward educational success and economic security. This paper outlines the emerging case for and shares a framework for two-generation approaches.

State Planning Office 2012 Poverty report

January 1, 2012 – General –

Each year since 1998, the Maine State Planning Office has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. The 2012 report (PDF) contains indicators updated through November 2011. Released January 2012.

Redrawing more equitable school boundaries is low-hanging fruit for supporting school integration, better outcomes for students of color

July 13, 2005 – Young Children, Older YouthEducation, Racial Equity

The Racial Equity Analytics Lab (REAL) at the Urban Institute recently published a resource detailing policy options that can help dismantle racial segregation in public school districts. Racial segregation in public schools is enduring, and a large body of research finds that it contributes to poorer socioeconomic outcomes and constrains opportunity for children of color. Often school attendance boundaries were intentionally initially created as ‘racial borders’; redrawing these boundaries is low-hanging fruit. Second, as school-choice mechanisms become increasingly common, school districts can ensure their lottery systems set quotas that encourage diversity and reserve seats for lower-income students. Finally, school districts can work with neighboring districts and local governments to address desegregation on a larger scale. #education #racialequity

Supports for rural Vermont women experiencing substance use disorder and partner violence are fragmented

July 12, 2005 – FamiliesRural, Substance Abuse

New research in the Journal of Rural Health examines barriers to safety for women experiencing opioid use disorder and partner violence, among a rural Vermont sample. Using one-on-one interview data, the authors’ findings reflect many of the patterns in rural social service literature. Barriers in the form of geographic isolation and transportation challenges render existing services mostly inaccessible, while a lack of integration between substance use and domestic violence systems complicates the delivery of supports. Paired with the feelings of social isolation and stigma expressed by participants, both formal and informal supports were often inadequate. The authors call for better integration across service providers and wider access to care for women struggling in rural places. #families #rural #substanceabuse