Resource Library

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The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Self-Regulation Snap Shot #6: A Focus on Young Adults

May 1, 2018 – Older Youth

Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called "co-regulation".

Juvenile Diversion Programs of Lewiston, Maine - Final Evaluation Report

October 20, 2017 – Older YouthJTGF Funded

From January 2016 through June 2017, the John T.Gorman Foundation funded three organizations: Tree Street Youth, Inc., The Root Cellar, and Maine Immigrant Refugee Services to provide diversion services to youth in the juvenile justice system in Lewiston, Maine. As part of the project, the Foundation contracted with Hornby Zeller Associates to conduct an evaluation of the programs to better understand the implementation process and the outcomes of the youth served during the course of the eighteen-month grant period. This report details the findings from the evaluation and describes the characteristics of youth served, program implementation and activities conducted by the three programs, and the youth’s outcomes. *JTGF-funded

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice With Adolescent Brain Development

July 31, 2017 – Older Youth

With knowledge of how the adolescent brain matures, adults can do more to ensure that the road leaving foster care will take young people to self-sufficiency and successful adulthood. And this guide tells how.

Evaluation of the Philadelphia GEAR UP Partnership Initiative

July 5, 2017 – Older Youth

In September 2009, with funding from the US Department of Education, the School District of Philadelphia launched a seven-year Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant to help prepare low-income youth for success in college and careers. The initiative brought together a strong network of partners and schools committed to improving the educational outcomes of Philadelphia public school students in 26 middle schools and seven high schools. From the start of the initiative, Metis partnered with the School District of Philadelphia to conduct an evaluation of the program’s implementation and outcomes. Through a mixed-methods evaluation, we continuously assessed the initiative’s progress towards its goals and objectives, and documented effective practices, challenges, and lessons learned from this important work.

Maine Head Start Report: 2017

June 25, 2017 – Young ChildrenJTGF Funded

The state of Maine has sixteen Head Start grantees, operating eleven Head Start (HS) programs, three American Indian & Alaska Native Head Start (AIAN HS) programs, and thirteen Early Head Start (EHS) programs (see Table 1). In the 2015–2016 program year, sites operated by these sixteen grantees served 4,126 children and pregnant women. The majority of Maine Head Start enrollees (88 percent) participate in a center-based program; the most popular program option is part-week (four days) enrollment in a center (Figure 1). Most children (91 percent) enrolled in part-week programs are also enrolled for part-day programming (6 hours or fewer per day).

Maine Head Start Report: 2017

June 20, 2017 – Young Children

The John T. Gorman Foundation provided funding for this report to provide a snapshot of Maine families served by Head Start.The state of Maine has sixteen Head Start grantees, operating eleven Head Start (HS) programs, three American Indian & Alaska Native Head Start (AIAN HS) programs, and thirteen Early Head Start (EHS) programs (see Table 1). In the 2015–2016 program year, sites operated by these sixteen grantees served 4,126 children and pregnant women. The majority of Maine Head Start enrollees (88 percent) participate in a center-based program; the most popular program option is part-week (four days) enrollment in a center (Figure 1). Most children (91 percent) enrolled in part-week programs are also enrolled for part-day programming (6 hours or fewer per day). *JTGF-funded

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

June 16, 2017 – Older Youth

In Maine, juvenile appeals are governed by the Maine Juvenile Code and the Maine Rules of Appellate Procedure. The Juvenile Code broadly dictates the types of rulings that a juvenile may appeal, and the Appellate Rules set out the details of how the appeal must proceed in the Law Court.

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

June 15, 2017 – Young Children, Families

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist.

Escaping Poverty: Predictors of Persistently Poor Children's Economic Success

June 2, 2017 – Young Children

A core American ideal is that all children should have a clear pathway to thrive and prosper as adults. Yet, children in poverty—particularly children who are persistently poor—face steep obstacles on their path to economic success.

Toward a More Equal Footing: Early Head Start in Maine

May 23, 2017 – Young ChildrenJTGF Funded

One program that connects the most economically vulnerable families with quality early childhood programming is Early Head Start (EHS). Subject to rigorous quality and staffing standards, implemented among the youngest children (prenatally through age 2), and delivered via a two-generation approach, EHS is a significant opportunity for providing quality care and education to a population that might otherwise struggle to access it. This brief explores the characteristics of EHS in Maine, compares them to the national landscape, and connects these findings to a discussion of the federal and state policy climates. *JTGF-funded

Measures of Growth 2017

April 26, 2017 – Families

The Maine Economic Growth Council and Maine Development Foundation are pleased to present Measures of Growth 2017, the 23rd annual report on the key indicators that measures Maine’s progress toward long-term economic growth and a high quality of life for all Maine people.

Children and Families at the Center

April 7, 2017 – Young Children, Families

In this shifting landscape, it is urgent that we articulate and advance a concrete agenda for children and families that leaders can embrace at the community, state, and national levels. Both political parties agree: Investing in children and families yields major returns, including safer communities, a more educated workforce, and a stable economy. We have an opportunity to build on this common ground and shared commitment while holding our systems accountable for ensuring positive outcomes for children, families, and communities.