Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Head Start in Rural America

May 1, 2018 – Young Children, Families

Nome, Alaska, situated on Alaska’s west coast near the Arctic Circle, boasts postcard-worthy views of the state’s wilderness and is the finish line for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.2 It is also home to nearly 4,000 residents and serves as the hub for nearby Kawerak Head Start, a grantee that operates 11 centers across the Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island.3 Their Head Start programs are the only early education options in the region, serving about 240 Alaska Native children from remote villages and towns.

Race and Economic Opportunity in the United States: An Intergenerational Perspective

May 1, 2018 – Families

Racial disparities are among the most visible and persistent features of American society. For example, in 2016, the median household income of black Americans was $39,500, compared with $65,000 for non-Hispanic white Americans (U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census 2017). The sources of these disparities have been heavily studied and debated, with proposed explanations ranging from residential segregation (e.g., Wilson 1987; Massey and Denton 1993) and discrimination (e.g., Pager 2003; Eberhardt et al. 2004; Bertrand and Mullainathan 2004) to differences in family structure (e.g., McAdoo 2002; Autor et al. 2016) and even genetics (e.g., Rushton and Jensen 2005)

A Simpler Aid Application for Low-Income College Students A Simpler Aid Application for Low-Income College Students

May 1, 2018 – Older Youth

Policymakers, post-secondary education leaders, and researchers agree: the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) can be a barrier to achieving our nation’s college access goals. The sheer number of complicated and personal questions asked on the form can deter some students from going to college, or from receiving federal aid. Concerns about the FAFSA’s negative impact on enrollment and financial aid have sparked a bipartisan push to simplify and shorten the form by removing ‘unnecessary’ questions.

Self-Regulation Snap Shot #6: A Focus on Young Adults

May 1, 2018 – Older Youth

Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called "co-regulation".

Juvenile Diversion Programs of Lewiston, Maine - Final Evaluation Report

October 20, 2017 – Older Youth

From January 2016 through June 2017, the John T.Gorman Foundation funded three organizations: Tree Street Youth, Inc., The Root Cellar, and Maine Immigrant Refugee Services to provide diversion services to youth in the juvenile justice system in Lewiston, Maine. As part of the project, the Foundation contracted with Hornby Zeller Associates to conduct an evaluation of the programs to better understand the implementation process and the outcomes of the youth served during the course of the eighteen-month grant period. This report details the findings from the evaluation and describes the characteristics of youth served, program implementation and activities conducted by the three programs, and the youth’s outcomes. *JTGF-funded

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice With Adolescent Brain Development

July 31, 2017 – Older Youth

With knowledge of how the adolescent brain matures, adults can do more to ensure that the road leaving foster care will take young people to self-sufficiency and successful adulthood. And this guide tells how.

Evaluation of the Philadelphia GEAR UP Partnership Initiative

July 5, 2017 – Older Youth

In September 2009, with funding from the US Department of Education, the School District of Philadelphia launched a seven-year Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant to help prepare low-income youth for success in college and careers. The initiative brought together a strong network of partners and schools committed to improving the educational outcomes of Philadelphia public school students in 26 middle schools and seven high schools. From the start of the initiative, Metis partnered with the School District of Philadelphia to conduct an evaluation of the program’s implementation and outcomes. Through a mixed-methods evaluation, we continuously assessed the initiative’s progress towards its goals and objectives, and documented effective practices, challenges, and lessons learned from this important work.

Maine Head Start Report: 2017

June 25, 2017 – Young Children

The state of Maine has sixteen Head Start grantees, operating eleven Head Start (HS) programs, three American Indian & Alaska Native Head Start (AIAN HS) programs, and thirteen Early Head Start (EHS) programs (see Table 1). In the 2015–2016 program year, sites operated by these sixteen grantees served 4,126 children and pregnant women. The majority of Maine Head Start enrollees (88 percent) participate in a center-based program; the most popular program option is part-week (four days) enrollment in a center (Figure 1). Most children (91 percent) enrolled in part-week programs are also enrolled for part-day programming (6 hours or fewer per day).

Maine Head Start Report: 2017

June 20, 2017 – Young Children

The John T. Gorman Foundation provided funding for this report to provide a snapshot of Maine families served by Head Start.The state of Maine has sixteen Head Start grantees, operating eleven Head Start (HS) programs, three American Indian & Alaska Native Head Start (AIAN HS) programs, and thirteen Early Head Start (EHS) programs (see Table 1). In the 2015–2016 program year, sites operated by these sixteen grantees served 4,126 children and pregnant women. The majority of Maine Head Start enrollees (88 percent) participate in a center-based program; the most popular program option is part-week (four days) enrollment in a center (Figure 1). Most children (91 percent) enrolled in part-week programs are also enrolled for part-day programming (6 hours or fewer per day). *JTGF-funded

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

June 16, 2017 – Older Youth

In Maine, juvenile appeals are governed by the Maine Juvenile Code and the Maine Rules of Appellate Procedure. The Juvenile Code broadly dictates the types of rulings that a juvenile may appeal, and the Appellate Rules set out the details of how the appeal must proceed in the Law Court.

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

June 15, 2017 – Young Children, Families

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist.

Escaping Poverty: Predictors of Persistently Poor Children's Economic Success

June 2, 2017 – Young Children

A core American ideal is that all children should have a clear pathway to thrive and prosper as adults. Yet, children in poverty—particularly children who are persistently poor—face steep obstacles on their path to economic success.