Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Brookings: A broad strategy for schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

March 27, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

As schools transistion to online learning, they can make important innovations to generate a better long term outcome. The author offers some specific proposals for how schools can help meet our broad social and economic needs. #COVID-19 #education

School Nutrition Heroes: On the Front Lines of COVID-19

March 25, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

School nutrition programs have continued responding to school closures due to the coronavirus pandemic with new meal distribution systems, including expanding meal pick up options to all students regardless of school meal enrollment (Natomas Unified School District, California) and offering drive-by pickups for families at multiple locations (Santa Clarita Valley, California). However, concerns about sustaining expensive delivery models are beginning to surface. #covid-19 #education #foodsecurity

Marshall Project: Coronavirus Leaves Foster Children With Nowhere to Go

March 24, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

This article looks at challenges to the child welfare system during the coronavirus outbreak including closure of family courts, suspension of family visitation, and fears of increasing abuse.

CLASP: Ensuring Young Children Have Healthy Meals During the Coronavirus Pandemic

March 23, 2020 – Young Children

This factsheet explores the nutrition provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Families First includes several important provisions that will help parents and caregivers keep food on the table during this crisis. Maine DHHS has requested emergency benefit increases for all current SNAP recipients and flexibility on various administrative requirements, as suggested by the factsheet. #COVID-19 #foodsecurity

Child Trends: School-based health centers can deliver care to vulnerable populations during the COVID-19 pandemic

March 18, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

Report makes recommendations to school districts for supporting the health and well being of students while schools are closed. School-based health centers disproportionately reach low-income students and those living in rural areas. For many, such services represent their only access to health care—at a time when they may need care the most. #covid-19 #education

CLASP: Policymaking Principles for Supporting Child Care and Early Education Through the Coronavirus Crisis.

March 18, 2020 – Young Children, Families

This report offers basic principles for supporting child care and early education through the coronavirus pandemic. The Author posits that Federal and state governments must invest significant resources to shore up the child care industry in bid to stabilize families who depend on child care and child care workers. #covid-19 #childcare #education

Where South Bend students can find buses with free access to Wi-Fi

March 18, 2020 – Young Children, Older Youth

With the shift to distance learning due to the coronavirus pandemic, many districts are addressing students’ unequal access to broadband challenges (see “Emerging Statistics” section, below for related research). Strategies for addressing this divide have clustered on circulation of mobile hot spots on buses (as in South Bend, Indiana and Rochester, New Hampshire), and the distribution of laptops for students (as in California), which were funded by private donors and foundations. Industry responses include the placement of hotspots in communities for public use, as Comcast and Atlantic Broadband have done. #covid-19 #education

Child Care in Crisis: Understanding the Effects of the Coronavirus Pandemic

March 17, 2020 – Families, Young Children

Child care providers are closed to all but essential workers in 16 states, and closed altogether in Rhode Island, although providers in many more states have chosen to close voluntarily. States are addressing resulting shortages in a host of ways, including by granting emergency exceptions to closures, offering emergency child care licenses, or loosening licensing regulations (see, for example, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Maine). However, the National Association for the Education of Young Children has emphasized the importance of funneling resources to existing child care providers instead of new programs, to ensure program sustainability and ensure children are cared for by experienced early childhood experts. #COVID-19 #childcare

Policies, Practices, and Resources for Child Care and Early Education Providers Amid the Coronavirus Crisis

March 12, 2020 – Young Children

For child care and early education providers, the federal government and many states already have plans developed in the aftermath of natural disasters in the past decade that outline best practices. #covid-19 #childcare #education

Extending Medicaid After Childbirth Could Reduce Maternal Deaths

December 13, 2019 – Families, Young Children

Nationwide, drug overdoses, suicides and pregnancy-related chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure are contributing to a rise in deaths among women during pregnancy, childbirth and the first 12 months after delivery. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 out of 5 of those deaths could be prevented with adequate medical attention. But Medicaid pregnancy coverage, which pays for nearly half of all births in the United States, expires 60 days after childbirth, leaving many women without health insurance at one of the most vulnerable times in their lives. This article from Pew Charitable Trusts looks at the effects of extending that coverage a year or more after the end of a pregnancy.

2019 Education Indicators for Maine

December 13, 2019 – Older Youth, Young Children

Of all our economic development strategies, education is the one with the greatest return on investment. Investment in the education of Maine people creates lifelong learners, opens pathways to promising careers, and produces civically engaged citizens. Educate Maine's annual Education Indicators report is a trusted, nonpartisan resource developed to better understand Maine’s entire education system—early childhood through postsecondary. Our focus is on the ten Indicators we have identified which we believe best measure Maine’s educational performance. The ten Indicators that we measure follow the path of each Maine child as he or she grows and learns. The Foundation contributed funding for this report. *JTGF-funded

ACEs and counter-ACEs: How positive and negative childhood experiences influence adult health

October 29, 2019 – Young Children, Older Youth

Numerous studies over the past two decades have found a link between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and worse adult health outcomes. Less well understood is how advantageous childhood experiences (counter-ACEs) may lead to better adult health, especially in the presence of adversity. Published in the Child Abuse and Neglect International Journal, this study from Brigham Young University concludes that counter-ACEs protect against poor adult health and lead to better adult wellness. When ACEs scores are moderate, counter-ACEs largely neutralize the negative effects of ACEs on adult health. Ultimately, the results demonstrate that a public health approach to promoting positive childhood experiences may promote better lifelong health.