Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

California child care workers union enters contract

July 23, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

California Governor Gavin Newsom has ratified a contract with Child Care Providers United, a first-of-its-kind child care labor union covering 40,000 California child care providers—largely women and often women of color—who provide subsidized child care across the state. The union is working to advocate for higher subsidy rates, more and better training, and a higher number of subsidized slots to address substantial gap between eligibility and uptake of fulltime subsidized care across the state. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

California child care workers union enters contract

July 23, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

California Governor Gavin Newsom has ratified a contract with Child Care Providers United, a first-of-its-kind child care labor union covering 40,000 California child care providers—largely women and often women of color—who provide subsidized child care across the state. The union is working to advocate for higher subsidy rates, more and better training, and a higher number of subsidized slots to address substantial gap between eligibility and uptake of fulltime subsidized care across the state. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Subsidizing child care costs would reduce poverty and enhance equity among New England families

July 21, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, Racial Equity, Workforce

New research from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and the Carsey School of Public Policy explores how proposed policies to cap child care expenses based on family income would affect poverty rates among New England families. Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure, the brief finds that such a policy could reduce poverty among New Englanders with child care costs by 40 percent; with the largest absolute declines for Black and Hispanic New Englanders, this would result in a substantial shrinkage of the racial-ethnic poverty gap. The effects of such a policy are not limited to the lowest income families either though: 9.5 percent of near poor New Englanders in families with child care costs would be lifted above twice the poverty line by such a policy. Although implementation would require careful planning, benefits would likely extend beyond poverty reductions, with families better able to participate in the labor force or access higher-quality care for their children. #racialequity #childcare #NewEngland #workforce

COVID further strains rural health safety net amid growing rural health and resource risks

July 7, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Health, Racial Equity, Rural

A healthcare analytics firm, the Chartis Group, has released a paper reporting on its ongoing data collection on rural health conditions and health care resources in light of the pandemic. The work identifies a pre-existing fragility in rural health care resources, with 138 rural hospital closures in the past decade, and 453 more vulnerable to closure. The authors note that rural places at risk of prolonged pandemic effects and those at risk of high hospital closures share key characteristics, including high rates of uninsurance and greater shares of residents with chronic illness. #covid-19 #rural #racialequity #health

Nurse home visiting program reduces child maltreatment and emergency care usage

July 7, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChild Welfare, Health

Newly published results from a randomized clinical trial find that participation in a postpartum nurse home visiting program reduces child maltreatment investigations and child emergency medical care usage each by one-third by age five. For 18 months beginning in July 2009, all children born in Durham County, North Carolina were randomly assigned to participate in the Family Connects program (2,327 children) or to receive treatment as usual (2,440 children). Program participation included 1-3 visits in children’s first month of life to identify family service needs, followed by connection to an “aligned” set of community services specific to their identified needs. Program duration was short, concluding by four weeks postpartum. A subset of 531 families were selected for evaluation purposes at five years out, with outcomes determined via state administrative child welfare records and hospital billing data. The reduction in child maltreatment investigations and child emergency medical care usage persisted across all study subgroups, regardless of presence of infant medical risks at birth, insurance status, single parent household status, parent race ethnicity, birthweight, and child sex. The authors conclude that the high-quality delivery and broad reach drove effectiveness, while the brevity of the program supports its efficiency and replicability. #childwelfare #health

Spanish-speaking Hispanic households faced higher levels of food insufficiency during COVID-19

July 7, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Food Security, Racial Equity

New research from the Census Bureau finds that Spanish-speaking Hispanic populations have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. The research finds food insufficiency rates consistently twice as high as among English-speaking Hispanic respondents, and employment loss at 50 percent higher. The analysis suggests unique risks for food insecurity in this population, including greater income insecurity and loss of employment. Further, safety net supports like SNAP may be less accessible to Hispanic Spanish speakers due to language barriers, inadequate advertising of benefit program availability, or eligibility concerns. #covid-19 #foodaccess #racialequity

Legacy of housing discrimination leaves underserved neighborhoods without healthy food access

June 30, 2021 – FamiliesFood Security, Housing, Racial Equity

A study of housing patterns and food environments publicized by the Urban Institute has been published in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology and demonstrates a link between housing discrimination and neighborhood investment. Using data from the University of Richmond, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the City of Baltimore, the authors find that “blockbusting”—when realtors “persuade white homeowners to sell their properties cheaply because of fears that people of color are moving into a neighborhood, and then resell those properties to newcomers for a profit” is associated with barriers to food access. Specifically, the authors find that areas experiencing historical and ongoing blockbusting score substantially lower on a healthy food access index than areas never subjected to the practice. #housing #racialequity #foodsecurity

Push to incentivize New Englanders to return to work continues

June 29, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Workforce

As multiple industries face a hiring crunch, New England business leaders are seeking support from the state to incentivize workers and address the labor shortage. #covid-19 #workforce

New research highlights the “true cost” of child care

June 28, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare

A new paper from the Center for American Progress updates and extends the Center’s earlier work on the cost of child care. The earlier work, available as an online data tool, allowed viewers to identify components of the high cost of child care; this update includes estimated salaries for providers in family child care homes, who often forgo a salary to keep costs affordable for families. The paper notes the discrepancy in child care subsidies and actual child care costs in most states, and highlights Maine as the only state that has aligned their subsidy policy with federally recommended levels. The author highlights the chasm between the true cost of high-quality care and the prices that families can bear, concluding that the only enduring solution is federal investment into the system. #childcare #Maine

“Remote work won’t save the heartland”

June 24, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Rural, Workforce

Enabled by more available remote work options, the COVID-19 pandemic spurred both employees and employers to flee cities in favor of more rural locations. Yet a new post from Brookings finds that rather than redistributing economic opportunity evenly nationwide, most companies are simply relocating to secondary tech hub cities like Austin, Denver, and Nashville, rather than to rural communities of the heartland. The post suggests that for rural places to meaningfully benefit from the “new” work landscape, the focus should be on building skilled and diverse workforces and work opportunities in authentic and expanding sectors, supported by robust policy and infrastructure investments that can support workers and their families. #covid-19 #workforce #rural

New research finds SNAP participants face barriers to a healthy diet

June 23, 2021 – FamiliesFood Security, Transportation

A U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service study focuses on the barriers that SNAP beneficiaries face in crafting a healthy diet. Using a combination of survey data, nationally representative of SNAP participants, and in-depth interviews, the research finds that 88 percent of SNAP recipients report barriers to accessing healthy foods. Three in five SNAP participants said cost prevented them from buying healthy foods, while 30 percent said lack of time to prepare healthy foods was a barrier, and 20 percent said transportation or distance to the store was. #foodsecurity #transportation

White homeowners are disproportionately refinancing their mortgages or selling their homes for equity

June 22, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Housing, Racial Equity

A new study from the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston, Atlanta, and Philadelphia utilizes anonymized data on 5.6 million mortgages to identify pandemic-era disparities in mortgage payments and home refinancing activity. The research reveals that Black homeowners have been more likely than white homeowners to have late or missed mortgage payments in the pandemic and are much less likely to have later caught up on payments. In addition, 12 percent of white homeowners have taken advantage of low interest rates to refinance their mortgages, while only 6 percent of Black homeowners have. These refinancing decisions eventually save borrowers billions of dollars, with only 3.7 percent of those savings going back to Black households. In part because Black borrowers typically have lower credit scores and higher risk for borrowing, the authors say, “borrowers who could use the payment reductions the most moving forward may be the least likely to obtain them.” #covid-19 #racialequity #housing