Resource Library

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country.

The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

We invite you to check back often, as this list is regularly updated.

 

Better serving the needs of America’s homeless students

October 29, 2019 – Older Youth

This post from Brookings Institution examines federal funding for homeless students. Among the federal government’s primary roles in K-12 schooling is the protection and promotion of educational opportunities for disadvantaged students, in part through compensatory funding.The piece argues that current funding is both insufficient and inefficiently allocated, but that there is reason for optimism for the years ahead.

State-by-State Impact of Proposed Changes to "Broad-Based Categorical Eligibility" in SNAP

October 23, 2019 – Families

A new study from Mathematica examines the share of SNAP-receiving households that would lose benefits under the Administration’s push to eliminate broad-based categorical eligibility (the automatic enrollment of people in SNAP if they qualify for other programs like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families). The report finds that 8 percent of Maine SNAP recipients (26,000) would lose benefits under this proposed change.

Supporting Community College Students from Start to Degree Completion: Long-Term Evidence from a Randomized Trial of CUNY's ASAP

October 23, 2019 – Older Youth

A recent article published in the American Economic Journal of Applied Economics examines the effects of a comprehensive program designed to serve low-income New York community college students requiring remedial courses. The three-year program provides intensive advising, tutoring, and financial supports, among other benefits. After a randomized controlled evaluation, the authors conclude that program enrollment increases 3-year graduation rates by 18 percentage points—the largest effect recorded in the field of community college graduation evaluation research of this kind.

Financial Incentives Increase Purchases Of Fruit And Vegetables Among Lower-Income Households With Children

October 23, 2019 – Families

New research in Health Affairs tests the effects of a 50 percent discount on produce among a sample of 600 low-income households in rural Maine, finding that spending on fruits and vegetables increased by 27 percent. The researchers conclude that this type of incentive program demonstrates desire for healthful food purchases and suggests that this scalable approach could have important effects on the social determinants of health.

Strengthening State Systems and Policies To Foster Two-generation Strategies and Practices

October 23, 2019 – Families

A new policy brief from the Working Poor Families Project that focuses on how to best strengthen state systems to improve economic conditions for working poor families through a two-generation approach. The brief highlights efforts in a few key states, largely centered on state systems that support local efforts for coordinating, enhancing, and strengthening family-level services. The report concludes that a two-generation lens can help spotlight ways that state systems and policies can become more equitable and effective for adults and children.

Income-Rent Gap Grew in 2018

October 23, 2019 – Families

New research from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explores the disparities between renters’ incomes and their housing costs. The report finds that after sharp declines in the 2001 and 2007 recessions, renters’ incomes have finally recovered to 2001 levels, adjusting for inflation. During this period, however, median rental costs have risen steadily, now at 13 percent higher than in 2001. The report notes that a parent working full time at the minimum wage cannot afford a two-bedroom apartment in any state, and calls for expanded funding for federal rental assistance and stronger state and local programs.

Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2018

October 23, 2019 – Families

The Census Bureau has released its annual Income and Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage reports, with data for 2018. The key findings include that median household income remained stable ($63,179), while poverty ticked down half a percentage point to finally drop below pre-recession levels (11.8 percent in 2018). Health insurance findings were less positive, as the number of people without health insurance increased by two million between 2017 and 2018. This shift was largely driven by people losing public insurance. Maine saw no significant change in the share of people who are uninsured (poverty was not reported by state).

Income and Poverty in the United States: 2018

October 23, 2019 – Families

The Census Bureau has released its annual Income and Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage reports, with data for 2018. The key findings include that median household income remained stable ($63,179), while poverty ticked down half a percentage point to finally drop below pre-recession levels (11.8 percent in 2018). Health insurance findings were less positive, as the number of people without health insurance increased by two million between 2017 and 2018. This shift was largely driven by people losing public insurance. Maine saw no significant change in the share of people who are uninsured (poverty was not reported by state).

Child Poverty Declines Slightly in 2018 to 18 Percent

October 23, 2019 – Families

New research from the Carsey School utilizes 2018 American Community Survey data released last week to estimate changes in child poverty since 2017. The data snapshot shows that 18 percent of children are still poor, although rates have finally returned to pre-recession levels. Poverty continues to be lowest in suburban areas and higher in cities and rural places. Changes in Maine child poverty were not statistically significant between 2017 and 2018.

Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit Can Support Older Working Americans

October 23, 2019 – Families, Seniors

More older adults are working now than at any point during the previous 25 years. From 1994 to 2018, the share of adults ages 65 to 69 participating in the labor force increased from about 22 percent to about 33 percent. But workforce participation is considerably lower for older adults who did not earn a college degree or high school diploma and who generally earn lower wages. These adults are particularly vulnerable to unstable retirement and may benefit from working, earning, and saving longer into their sixties. This article from the Urban Institute argues that extending the earned income tax credit (EITC) to workers over the age of 64 without custodial children and increasing benefits for these workers could raise employment among older Americans. Staying in the workforce longer can help seniors make ends meet and improve their retirement security.

Maine Data Glimpse: Incarceration Rates and Annual Admissions to County Jails, 2015

September 4, 2019 – General

Nationwide, the number of people in jails rose by 400% between 1970 and 2014. In 2015 in Maine, more than 190 per 100,000 residents were incarcerated in jails on a given day, and more than 4,500 per 100,000 residents were admitted to jail during the year. There is considerable inter-county variability in incarceration rates, even though annual admissions are relatively uniform across counties.

o Because pretrial incarceration is a significant share of jail populations, this is not necessarily just a function of differences in the adjudication process.

o These county differences may be due to unequal distributions of populations more likely to commit more serious crimes, differential ability to make bail across places, or differences in county justice systems, among other possibilities.

Androscoggin and Washington Counties admit at high rates, but incarcerate at about the statewide average rate. Somerset admits and incarcerates above average rates, while Lincoln admits at about average rates but incarcerates at far above average.

Aging and Declining Populations in Northern New England: Is There a Role for Immigration?

September 4, 2019 – General

A new brief from the New England Public Policy Center at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston explores the issues of Northern New England’s aging and shrinking population with the goal of identifying a role for immigration in stabilizing these trends. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the three highest median ages in the nation. Further, Maine is projected to have more residents aged 65 or older than residents under 18 by 2020—at least 15 years earlier than expected nationwide. The author finds that some of the towns with the slowest growth among native-born populations have seen their population losses offset by immigrant population increases (for example, Calais, Maine); nearly 60% of growth in these slow-growing places was driven by immigration. The brief concludes by addressing possible immigrant incentive approaches, as well as recognizing the need for federal resources to reduce strain on resettlement destinations (e.g., Portland, Maine).