Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Supporting the ECE workforce through COVID-19 relief mechanisms

August 3, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic’s dramatic impact on the Early Childhood Education (ECE) workforce and subsequent funds made available through the American Rescue Plan Act have created an opportunity to build ECE workforce capacity and create evidence-based improvements to the system. The Urban Institute’s Young Scholars program identified several opportunities within the ECE system, including recognizing the critical supportive role of Head Start assistant teachers, who are more likely than lead teachers to speak their students’ languages; recognizing the stressors early educators face—particularly educators of color—and addressing those challenges with greater socioemotional and mental health supports; and providing pre-service kindergarten and first grade teachers with supports to address absenteeism among students. The piece highlights the specific funding streams that may be used to address these areas. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Illinois announces $200 Million investment for early childhood workers

July 29, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

Illinois recently passed into law HB 2878, which uses $200 million in federal funds to provide training, mentorship programs, and scholarships for child care workers to pursue further education over the next two years. The bill also establishes a statewide early childhood education consortium to improve access and direct funding. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Reducing the Black-white racial wealth gap will require dedicated and comprehensive policy solutions

July 28, 2021 – FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Education, Housing, Racial Equity, Wealth & Assets, Wealth and Assets, Workforce

A new issue brief from the Center for American Progress examines the Black/white wealth gap and summarizes a set of proposals and policy actions to address the gap. Some recommendations include allowing the U.S. Postal Service to conduct banking services to increase community access; investing in research and development opportunities for Black innovators and inventors; dedicating additional funds for Black entrepreneurs; developing a National Savings Plan to provide retirement accounts to public sector workers; and investing in young children through childcare and education. #racialequity #childcare #education #housing #workforce #covid-19 #wealth&assets

How to stabilize infant and toddler care with pandemic relief funds

July 27, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Workforce

A new fieldnote published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston describes possibilities for using funds from the Child Care Stabilization portion of the American Rescue Plan Act to stabilize infant and toddler care. One option includes issuing grants to child care providers that could subsidize the operational cost of infant/toddler care to align the price with that of care for older children. Another option is creating grants to serve as incentives for attracting infant/toddler-serving professionals by offsetting the wage penalty typically present in that sector, in hopes of growing and stabilizing the workforce. Finally, the note suggests increasing child care subsidy rates beyond the 75th percentile of market rates for infant and toddler slots. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce

California child care workers union enters contract

July 23, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

California Governor Gavin Newsom has ratified a contract with Child Care Providers United, a first-of-its-kind child care labor union covering 40,000 California child care providers—largely women and often women of color—who provide subsidized child care across the state. The union is working to advocate for higher subsidy rates, more and better training, and a higher number of subsidized slots to address substantial gap between eligibility and uptake of fulltime subsidized care across the state. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Push to incentivize New Englanders to return to work continues

June 29, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Workforce

As multiple industries face a hiring crunch, New England business leaders are seeking support from the state to incentivize workers and address the labor shortage. #covid-19 #workforce

“Remote work won’t save the heartland”

June 24, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Rural, Workforce

Enabled by more available remote work options, the COVID-19 pandemic spurred both employees and employers to flee cities in favor of more rural locations. Yet a new post from Brookings finds that rather than redistributing economic opportunity evenly nationwide, most companies are simply relocating to secondary tech hub cities like Austin, Denver, and Nashville, rather than to rural communities of the heartland. The post suggests that for rural places to meaningfully benefit from the “new” work landscape, the focus should be on building skilled and diverse workforces and work opportunities in authentic and expanding sectors, supported by robust policy and infrastructure investments that can support workers and their families. #covid-19 #workforce #rural

Pandemic impacts review finds decline in ECCE program enrollment, setbacks to young child learning and development

June 21, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Education, Racial Equity, Workforce

The University of Michigan and the Urban Institute have partnered to synthesize the pandemic’s effects on young children and on the early childhood care and education (ECCE) programs that serve them. Reviewing 63 studies on COVID-19 and early childhood disruptions, the authors find consistent documentation of ECCE enrollment declines, a mix of in-person and remote settings for programs that were available, and significant setbacks to young child learning and development, disproportionately born by low-income families and families of color. The paper makes short-term recommendations for leveraging immediate COVID-related resources, but also provides guidance on strengthening the ECCE system for the long-term, including investing in the workforce and in cohesive systems planning. #covid-19 #childcare #racialequity #workforce #education

Remote work and child care closures hasten need to revamp fragile child care system

June 21, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Workforce

A Bipartisan Policy Center report describes new survey results assessing how parents’ work arrangements are interacting with their child care needs. Results suggest that 81 percent of working parents with children under 5 who have the option to work remote are utilizing that option. Most parents (60 percent) would like to keep this option to some extent moving forward to enable flexibility of childcare. This is particularly relevant for parents with inconsistent or nontraditional work hours, which disproportionately includes Black, less educated, and low-income parents. The survey shows that only 29 percent of parents had access to the same childcare situation as pre-pandemic, and threequarters of parents said they had missed a full day of work in the past month due to child care constraints. Finally, respondents across the political spectrum expressed support for high-quality child care access, with 95 percent of liberals and 79 percent of conservatives agreeing that more government support of child care would benefit children and families. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce

Two policy opportunities to improve the re-entry system for returning citizens

June 8, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Food Security, Racial Equity, Workforce

The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities notes that the American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan each offer policy opportunities to support incarcerated people’s re-entry into communities. Given the substantial evidence that re-entry is complicated by insufficient supports, legal barriers, and discrimination, these policies offer a chance to improve those support systems and reduce risks of re-incarceration. #covid-19 #racialequity #foodsecurity #workforce

Vermont continues efforts to lure movers and support the unemployed

June 2, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Workforce

To support workforce development, Vermont Governor Phil Scott has extended 2018 legislation offering financial incentives for workers to move to Vermont; also included in the legislation was an increase to state unemployment benefits. The efforts are funded by an increase to unemployment insurance tax on businesses expected to bring $100 million in revenue over the next few years. #covid-19 #workforce

Pandemic-related stress felt by moms can trickle down to their kids

May 27, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenCOVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity, Workforce

Data from the Rapid Assessment of Pandemic Impact on Development – Early Childhood revealed that widespread job loss and increased emotional strain has impacted mothers and young children. On top of job loss, mothers have experienced higher levels of anxiety, depression, stress, and loneliness that has influenced their children’s levels of emotional distress, leading to anxiety, fear, and worry among young children. All of this has been compounded by caregivers having a lower capacity to reduce their children’s stress levels or protect them from distress. Despite these findings, unemployed mothers were still able to care for children with the help of aid, such as unemployment insurance and stimulus payments. #covid-19 #workforce #racialequity #mentalhealth