Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

What does capping child care co-pays look like in each state?

August 18, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity

A new resource published by CLASP provides a state-by-state analysis of the Child Care for Working Families Act’s sliding scale co-payment proposal. The act would cap out-of-pocket child care costs for families earning less than 150 percent of their state’s median income with co-pays varying across four levels. For instance, families earning less than 75 percent of median income would have zero co-pay, while families earning 125-150 percent would pay between 4 and 7 percent of their income. For Maine, this translates to free child care for families earning less than $61,888, and a maximum co-payment of $8,820 for Maine families earning up to $126,003. #covid-19 #childcare #racialequity

Supporting immigrant children and families is critical in rebuilding the child care system and overall economy

August 11, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

CLASP recently published a brief outlining how immigrant providers and families can utilize the two child care funding streams made available in the American Rescue Plan Act: $24 billion in stabilization grants and another $15 billion for child care assistance through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Because immigrant families are a significant share of the nation’s families with children, and because immigrant workers comprise a substantial slice of child care providers, CLASP argues that excluding immigrant needs from planning processes risks leaving significant numbers of families and children behind. CLASP recommends that state agencies conduct outreach in immigrant communities to inform them about their eligibility for relief and to reduce fear and misunderstanding, support mental health services for immigrant workers and families, use funds to improve and coordinate state data systems, and be sure to bring the voices of immigrant communities into the decision-making process. #covid-19 #childcare #mentalhealth #racialequity

Supporting the ECE workforce through COVID-19 relief mechanisms

August 3, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic’s dramatic impact on the Early Childhood Education (ECE) workforce and subsequent funds made available through the American Rescue Plan Act have created an opportunity to build ECE workforce capacity and create evidence-based improvements to the system. The Urban Institute’s Young Scholars program identified several opportunities within the ECE system, including recognizing the critical supportive role of Head Start assistant teachers, who are more likely than lead teachers to speak their students’ languages; recognizing the stressors early educators face—particularly educators of color—and addressing those challenges with greater socioemotional and mental health supports; and providing pre-service kindergarten and first grade teachers with supports to address absenteeism among students. The piece highlights the specific funding streams that may be used to address these areas. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Illinois announces $200 Million investment for early childhood workers

July 29, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

Illinois recently passed into law HB 2878, which uses $200 million in federal funds to provide training, mentorship programs, and scholarships for child care workers to pursue further education over the next two years. The bill also establishes a statewide early childhood education consortium to improve access and direct funding. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Reducing the Black-white racial wealth gap will require dedicated and comprehensive policy solutions

July 28, 2021 – FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Education, Housing, Racial Equity, Wealth & Assets, Wealth and Assets, Workforce

A new issue brief from the Center for American Progress examines the Black/white wealth gap and summarizes a set of proposals and policy actions to address the gap. Some recommendations include allowing the U.S. Postal Service to conduct banking services to increase community access; investing in research and development opportunities for Black innovators and inventors; dedicating additional funds for Black entrepreneurs; developing a National Savings Plan to provide retirement accounts to public sector workers; and investing in young children through childcare and education. #racialequity #childcare #education #housing #workforce #covid-19 #wealth&assets

How to stabilize infant and toddler care with pandemic relief funds

July 27, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Workforce

A new fieldnote published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston describes possibilities for using funds from the Child Care Stabilization portion of the American Rescue Plan Act to stabilize infant and toddler care. One option includes issuing grants to child care providers that could subsidize the operational cost of infant/toddler care to align the price with that of care for older children. Another option is creating grants to serve as incentives for attracting infant/toddler-serving professionals by offsetting the wage penalty typically present in that sector, in hopes of growing and stabilizing the workforce. Finally, the note suggests increasing child care subsidy rates beyond the 75th percentile of market rates for infant and toddler slots. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce

California child care workers union enters contract

July 23, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

California Governor Gavin Newsom has ratified a contract with Child Care Providers United, a first-of-its-kind child care labor union covering 40,000 California child care providers—largely women and often women of color—who provide subsidized child care across the state. The union is working to advocate for higher subsidy rates, more and better training, and a higher number of subsidized slots to address substantial gap between eligibility and uptake of fulltime subsidized care across the state. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Pandemic impacts review finds decline in ECCE program enrollment, setbacks to young child learning and development

June 21, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Education, Racial Equity, Workforce

The University of Michigan and the Urban Institute have partnered to synthesize the pandemic’s effects on young children and on the early childhood care and education (ECCE) programs that serve them. Reviewing 63 studies on COVID-19 and early childhood disruptions, the authors find consistent documentation of ECCE enrollment declines, a mix of in-person and remote settings for programs that were available, and significant setbacks to young child learning and development, disproportionately born by low-income families and families of color. The paper makes short-term recommendations for leveraging immediate COVID-related resources, but also provides guidance on strengthening the ECCE system for the long-term, including investing in the workforce and in cohesive systems planning. #covid-19 #childcare #racialequity #workforce #education

Remote work and child care closures hasten need to revamp fragile child care system

June 21, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Workforce

A Bipartisan Policy Center report describes new survey results assessing how parents’ work arrangements are interacting with their child care needs. Results suggest that 81 percent of working parents with children under 5 who have the option to work remote are utilizing that option. Most parents (60 percent) would like to keep this option to some extent moving forward to enable flexibility of childcare. This is particularly relevant for parents with inconsistent or nontraditional work hours, which disproportionately includes Black, less educated, and low-income parents. The survey shows that only 29 percent of parents had access to the same childcare situation as pre-pandemic, and threequarters of parents said they had missed a full day of work in the past month due to child care constraints. Finally, respondents across the political spectrum expressed support for high-quality child care access, with 95 percent of liberals and 79 percent of conservatives agreeing that more government support of child care would benefit children and families. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce

Making best use of federal child care support means strategic partnerships to build capacity

May 4, 2021 – FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Education

A new report from CLASP elucidates the role and extent of different federal relief funding streams that can be used to enhance child care facilities. Some resources are specific to child care (e.g., the Child Care & Development Block Grant) while others, available to states and localities as general small business and capital project funds, could also be leveraged in this way. CLASP identifies which sources can be used for renovations, technical assistance, equipment, hazard pay, and other infrastructure-supporting uses. Authors suggest partnerships with Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) are an especially important strategy for states and tribes to consider, given that these partnerships can open access to new funding streams, development expertise, real estate, and technical assistance. #covid-19 #education #childcare

New research links elementary school closures to reduced maternal labor force participation

March 12, 2021 – FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Education

An article published in Gender & Society finds that COVID-19-related school closures are associated with reduced maternal employment, concluding that schools are part of the nation’s critical care infrastructure. The authors collected operating status of schools (data not yet available publicly), linking this information to data on labor force participation from the current population survey. The authors find that in states with fully remote instruction, the gender labor force participation gap grew over the pandemic and stayed smaller in places where hybrid (like Maine) or in-person instruction was available. The authors conclude that states should continue to prioritize continuous in-person child care and schooling so parents, and especially mothers, can continue to engage in paid work. #covid-19 #education #childcare

Federal Policies Can Address the Impact of Structural Racism on Black Families’ Access to Early Care and Education

March 5, 2021 – General –

This brief from Child Trends is the second in a series examining timely topics that are relevant to Black families and children in the United States. It sheds light on the role of federal policies in creating, maintaining, and addressing inequities brought about by structural racism, with a specific focus on access to early care and education for Black families. The first brief provides a brief summary of recent data and historical context on family structure, employment and income, and geography for Black people with young children in the United States. The third brief uses national, state, and local data to examine housing access and other available supports for Black families, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. #childcare #education #racialequity #covid-19