Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

New Hampshire summer school and camps support youth with academic and social losses

May 19, 2021 – General

The Concord Monitor reports that nonprofit organizations and school districts in New Hampshire are experiencing increased demand for summer programming as they work to address losses of the past year. Drawing on federal COVID funds, the state has made low-income children and children with disabilities eligible for summer camp subsidies. Additional support is being made available to offset the cost of “learning pods,” enhancing traditional summer school offerings. Other organizations focus on preparing children for kindergarten or helping older students achieve missing credits and reconfigure disrupted educational plans from last year. #covid-19 #education

Making best use of federal child care support means strategic partnerships to build capacity

May 4, 2021 – General

A new report from CLASP elucidates the role and extent of different federal relief funding streams that can be used to enhance child care facilities. Some resources are specific to child care (e.g., the Child Care & Development Block Grant) while others, available to states and localities as general small business and capital project funds, could also be leveraged in this way. CLASP identifies which sources can be used for renovations, technical assistance, equipment, hazard pay, and other infrastructure-supporting uses. Authors suggest partnerships with Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) are an especially important strategy for states and tribes to consider, given that these partnerships can open access to new funding streams, development expertise, real estate, and technical assistance. #covid-19 #education #childcare

Despite Connecticut’s focused investments, more devices and internet connections didn’t completely close the homework gap

April 29, 2021 – General

In July 2020, the governor of Connecticut allocated more than $40 million in federal aid to purchasing a laptop and one-year internet connection for K-12 students attending school remotely without sufficient digital equipment. Navigating the difficult logistics of quantifying need and disseminating equipment, the state did enhance access, but some teachers estimate that 10 percent of students never logged in at all. By February 2021, the state had released a report summarizing some of the barriers to connecting families for remote learning, shedding light on a complexity of challenges that extend beyond mere access. #covid-19 #education

New factsheet explores easing the transition to school for young children

April 21, 2021 – General

A new factsheet from the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Mid-Atlantic summarizes strategies for supporting school transitions for young children. The transition to kindergarten and first grade is a critical time for children, and research has shown that students from lower-income families are at a higher risk for poor school transitions. The factsheet highlights evidence-based ways that school districts can foster more equitable transitions through adequately supporting educators, families, and children. #covid-19 #education

Building an Equitable Recovery Requires Investing in Children, Supporting Workers, and Expanding Health Coverage

March 24, 2021 – General

The pandemic and its economic fallout have exposed glaring weaknesses in our nation’s economy that leave millions of people unprotected in bad economic times and prevent them from fully benefiting from a strong economy in good times. The recovery legislation that policymakers will consider later this year provides a historic opportunity to build toward an equitable recovery where all children can reach their full potential, where workers in low-paid jobs and those with fewer job prospects have the supports to help them meet their needs and get ahead, and where everyone has access to affordable health coverage. Achieving these goals requires attacking long-standing disparities in our nation, deeply rooted in racism and discrimination, that have led to starkly unequal opportunities and outcomes in education, employment, health, and housing. #covid-19 #economy #racialequity #workforce #education #housing

New global report on literacy skills shows potential for massive learning lag

March 23, 2021 – General

A recent report released by the anti-poverty nonprofit One Campaign projected that globally, 70 million 10-year-olds could lack expected literary skills in 2021. Of these students, almost 12 million might be unable to read as a result of COVID-19-related impacts on education systems around the world. Children who do not learn basic literacy skills by age 10 are termed to be in “learning poverty,” which has impacts that carry throughout the life course. The report also finds that up to 20 million girls globally may not return to school even once pandemic-related disruptions end. The authors emphasize the role of urgent, sustained government investment to stem this trend. #covid-19 #education

New research links elementary school closures to reduced maternal labor force participation

March 12, 2021 – Families

An article published in Gender & Society finds that COVID-19-related school closures are associated with reduced maternal employment, concluding that schools are part of the nation’s critical care infrastructure. The authors collected operating status of schools (data not yet available publicly), linking this information to data on labor force participation from the current population survey. The authors find that in states with fully remote instruction, the gender labor force participation gap grew over the pandemic and stayed smaller in places where hybrid (like Maine) or in-person instruction was available. The authors conclude that states should continue to prioritize continuous in-person child care and schooling so parents, and especially mothers, can continue to engage in paid work. #covid-19 #education #childcare

Federal Policies Can Address the Impact of Structural Racism on Black Families’ Access to Early Care and Education

March 5, 2021 – General

This brief from Child Trends is the second in a series examining timely topics that are relevant to Black families and children in the United States. It sheds light on the role of federal policies in creating, maintaining, and addressing inequities brought about by structural racism, with a specific focus on access to early care and education for Black families. The first brief provides a brief summary of recent data and historical context on family structure, employment and income, and geography for Black people with young children in the United States. The third brief uses national, state, and local data to examine housing access and other available supports for Black families, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. #childcare #education #racialequity #covid-19

Temporary SNAP extension will enhance access for college students

March 4, 2021 – Older Youth

Despite elevated rates of food insecurity among college students, strict eligibility criteria have meant low participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Typically, in order to be eligible for SNAP, students must attend college at least half time, work 20 or more hours per week, and meet income and other qualifications. However, as a part of its December pandemic relief efforts, Congress passed two temporary exemptions specific to college students enrolled at least half time. These temporarily extend SNAP eligibility to those who are also eligible for federal or state work-study and those with an Expected Family Contribution of $0 for the academic year, regardless of employment. State agencies, academic institutions, and non-profit organizations are working to inform students of these changes. #covid-19 #foodsecurity #education

Many colleges that dropped test requirements during the pandemic may not reinstate them

February 25, 2021 – Older Youth

According to a recent survey of public and private four-year higher education institutions, the majority of institutions that dropped ACT and/or SAT admission requirements due to the pandemic are unlikely to bring them back. The survey was commissioned by ACT Inc., the owner of the ACT exam, and estimates that around 50 percent of four-year institutions had “test-optional” policies before the pandemic. Another 30 percent moved from test-required to test-optional in response to the pandemic. However, most of these newly test-optional institutions expressed that they were not at all likely to become “test-blind” and completely remove test scores from the evaluation of applicants. The most common reason they selected for not being likely to adopt a test-blind policy was that test scores are “too useful” to completely abandon. Although early evidence suggests that test-optional institutions have greater applicant diversity, whether students who do not submit test scores are admitted, financially assisted, and matriculated at the same levels of those who do submit has not yet been rigorously examined #covid-19 #education

New Data Show Stark Racial and Ethnic Differences in Young People’s Healthy Development

February 22, 2021 – General

Urban Institute reports that young people’s healthy development is critical to the country’s social and economic future. But not all children have equal opportunities to thrive. Because of discriminatory, institutionalized policies and practices, children of color are more likely to face unique challenges, such as loss of family income, learning loss, and housing instability, than white children. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated these challenges. New data from the Social Genome Model (SGM)—a tool that identifies developmental and social mobility patterns from birth through adulthood—illustrate this problem. They show Black and Latinx young people are much less likely to be on track for healthy development than white peers, resulting in markedly different levels of well-being as young adults. The data underscore the need for policies and programs that break down the structural economic and social forces that create these inequitable outcomes. #covid-19 #racialequity #education

Delayed and Forgone Health Care for Children during the COVID-19 Pandemic

February 16, 2021 – General

Drawing on the Urban Institute’s September 2020 Coronavirus Tracking Survey, a nationally representative survey of adults ages 18 to 64, UI examined delayed and forgone health care for children under 19 during the pandemic because of parents’ concerns about exposure to the coronavirus or limits on providers’ services due to the pandemic. They find that 28.8 percent of parents delayed or did not get one or more types of care for their children for these reasons. Parents with lower incomes were more likely than those with higher incomes to report their children delayed or missed out on multiple types of care. Among parents whose children delayed or did not get care, more than one in four reported negative effects on their children’s health, schooling, and other daily activities. #covid-19 #education #health