Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

Supporting immigrant children and families is critical in rebuilding the child care system and overall economy

August 11, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

CLASP recently published a brief outlining how immigrant providers and families can utilize the two child care funding streams made available in the American Rescue Plan Act: $24 billion in stabilization grants and another $15 billion for child care assistance through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Because immigrant families are a significant share of the nation’s families with children, and because immigrant workers comprise a substantial slice of child care providers, CLASP argues that excluding immigrant needs from planning processes risks leaving significant numbers of families and children behind. CLASP recommends that state agencies conduct outreach in immigrant communities to inform them about their eligibility for relief and to reduce fear and misunderstanding, support mental health services for immigrant workers and families, use funds to improve and coordinate state data systems, and be sure to bring the voices of immigrant communities into the decision-making process. #covid-19 #childcare #mentalhealth #racialequity

American Rescue Plan’s Fiscal Recovery Funds provide diverse support to those most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic

August 5, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

Early data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities show that the $350 billion in Fiscal Recovery Funds from the American Rescue Plan has helped states, localities, U.S. territories, and tribal governments invest in education, employment, emergency housing relief, mental health services, and broadband improvements. These investments vary in approach but include expanding and strengthening affordable housing and homelessness programs; youth mental health systems; workforce skills training; college scholarships and community college programs; alternatives to policing; services for immigrants; high-speed internet in rural areas; cash assistance and disability benefits; child care systems; food banks; and infrastructure in schools. In addition, the Fiscal Recovery Funds are helping avoid budget cuts to vulnerable areas. #covid-19 #racialequity #mentalhealth

No Child Left Offline: It’s time to prioritize digital equity in America’s public schools

August 2, 2021 – Young Children, Older YouthCOVID-19, Education, Mental Health, Racial Equity

The pandemic’s impact on K-12 students has yet to be fully realized, but schools are bracing for learning losses, mental health challenges, and vast systemic and educational disparities revealed from the switch to remote learning. More than 9 million students did not have access to broadband service or an internet-enabled device at the beginning of the pandemic, having no choice but to miss online school. And because the virus has disproportionately impacted communities of color, students of color have been disproportionately learning remotely. To promote digital equity in education, Brookings scholars propose a “No Child Left Offline” initiative. #covid-19 #education #racialequity #mentalhealth

COVID-era remote patient monitoring supports at-home care for rural residents

July 14, 2021 – SeniorsCOVID-19, Health, Mental Health, Rural

In response to the pandemic, a Midwestern health system created a remote patient monitoring program that allows health care providers to monitor and advise patients without requiring an emergency room visit. The program includes vital-sign-monitoring equipment and a tablet equipped with video communication software, which only requires a cell signal and not internet access. Although the program was created to reduce hospital crowding and in-person exposures in the pandemic, providers find that not only do patients appreciate home-based care, providers are also able to more quickly identify changes in patient status given the ongoing monitoring. The additional benefit of easy check-ins also eases anxiety and loneliness among older adults living alone. #covid-19 #rural #mentalhealth #health

COVID-era remote patient monitoring supports at-home care for rural residents

July 14, 2021 – SeniorsCOVID-19, Health, Mental Health, Rural

In response to the pandemic, a Midwestern health system created a remote patient monitoring program that allows health care providers to monitor and advise patients without requiring an emergency room visit. The program includes vital-sign-monitoring equipment and a tablet equipped with video communication software, which only requires a cell signal and not internet access. Although the program was created to reduce hospital crowding and in-person exposures in the pandemic, providers find that not only do patients appreciate home-based care, providers are also able to more quickly identify changes in patient status given the ongoing monitoring. The additional benefit of easy check-ins also eases anxiety and loneliness among older adults living alone. #covid-19 #rural #mentalhealth #health

Providing more rural transit for isolated older adults can be cost-effective

May 21, 2021 – SeniorsMental Health, Rural Transportation

Researchers at North Dakota State University have published their U.S. Department of Transportation-sponsored cost-benefits analysis on public transportation for older adults. Specifically, researchers weighed the costs of expanding public transportation to increase mobility options with the benefits of reducing social isolation among older adults living in small urban and rural areas. Across 10 study states, they found that it was cost-effective to provide between 3-10 public transportation trips per month per isolated older adult; that is, the costs of providing this transportation were lower than the extra Medicare costs associated with isolation. #mentalhealth #rural #transportation