Resource Library

COVID-19 Update: The John T. Gorman Foundation is curating a list of resources, emerging best practices, and innovative ideas from across the country to help local organizations serve vulnerable Mainers during the coronavirus outbreak. To access those resources, visit www.jtgfoundation.org/resources/covid-19 or enter Covid-19 in the keyword search. Those results can be further focused by using the “Filter by” menu above to filter by population type (Young Children, Older Youth, Families, and Seniors) or by clicking the following links: childcare, education, food security, housing, rural areas, and workforce.

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

What does capping child care co-pays look like in each state?

August 18, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity

A new resource published by CLASP provides a state-by-state analysis of the Child Care for Working Families Act’s sliding scale co-payment proposal. The act would cap out-of-pocket child care costs for families earning less than 150 percent of their state’s median income with co-pays varying across four levels. For instance, families earning less than 75 percent of median income would have zero co-pay, while families earning 125-150 percent would pay between 4 and 7 percent of their income. For Maine, this translates to free child care for families earning less than $61,888, and a maximum co-payment of $8,820 for Maine families earning up to $126,003. #covid-19 #childcare #racialequity

How COVID relief funds continue to feed one California county’s seniors

August 11, 2021 – SeniorsCOVID-19, Food Security

In response to the uptick in pandemic-related food insecurity, California Governor Gavin Newsom supported the “Great Plates” program in Spring 2020, which used federal funding to purchase and deliver local restaurant meals to seniors facing food insecurity. With the recent expiration of funds for that program, San Mateo County has decided to leverage its own COVID relief funds to continue a variation on the program through the next two fiscal years. #covid-19 #foodsecurity

Material hardship declines after Child Tax Credit payout

August 11, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Food Security

A new analysis of Household Pulse Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau finds that fewer households experienced trouble obtaining sufficient food and paying household expenses in the two-week period following the first Child Tax Credit advance payments began on July 15. Comparing reported food insufficiency rates between adults in households with children and those in households without, the analysis shows a 2.6 percentage point decline in food insufficiency among households with kids after the credit was issued, compared with no decline in households without children. Trouble paying expenses declined by 2.5 percentage points among households with children in this period, compared with a 1 percentage point increase in reported difficulty among households without children. #covid-19 #foodsecurity

Supporting immigrant children and families is critical in rebuilding the child care system and overall economy

August 11, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

CLASP recently published a brief outlining how immigrant providers and families can utilize the two child care funding streams made available in the American Rescue Plan Act: $24 billion in stabilization grants and another $15 billion for child care assistance through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Because immigrant families are a significant share of the nation’s families with children, and because immigrant workers comprise a substantial slice of child care providers, CLASP argues that excluding immigrant needs from planning processes risks leaving significant numbers of families and children behind. CLASP recommends that state agencies conduct outreach in immigrant communities to inform them about their eligibility for relief and to reduce fear and misunderstanding, support mental health services for immigrant workers and families, use funds to improve and coordinate state data systems, and be sure to bring the voices of immigrant communities into the decision-making process. #covid-19 #childcare #mentalhealth #racialequity

American Rescue Plan’s Fiscal Recovery Funds provide diverse support to those most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic

August 5, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

Early data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities show that the $350 billion in Fiscal Recovery Funds from the American Rescue Plan has helped states, localities, U.S. territories, and tribal governments invest in education, employment, emergency housing relief, mental health services, and broadband improvements. These investments vary in approach but include expanding and strengthening affordable housing and homelessness programs; youth mental health systems; workforce skills training; college scholarships and community college programs; alternatives to policing; services for immigrants; high-speed internet in rural areas; cash assistance and disability benefits; child care systems; food banks; and infrastructure in schools. In addition, the Fiscal Recovery Funds are helping avoid budget cuts to vulnerable areas. #covid-19 #racialequity #mentalhealth

Supporting the ECE workforce through COVID-19 relief mechanisms

August 3, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic’s dramatic impact on the Early Childhood Education (ECE) workforce and subsequent funds made available through the American Rescue Plan Act have created an opportunity to build ECE workforce capacity and create evidence-based improvements to the system. The Urban Institute’s Young Scholars program identified several opportunities within the ECE system, including recognizing the critical supportive role of Head Start assistant teachers, who are more likely than lead teachers to speak their students’ languages; recognizing the stressors early educators face—particularly educators of color—and addressing those challenges with greater socioemotional and mental health supports; and providing pre-service kindergarten and first grade teachers with supports to address absenteeism among students. The piece highlights the specific funding streams that may be used to address these areas. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

No Child Left Offline: It’s time to prioritize digital equity in America’s public schools

August 2, 2021 – Young Children, Older YouthCOVID-19, Education, Mental Health, Racial Equity

The pandemic’s impact on K-12 students has yet to be fully realized, but schools are bracing for learning losses, mental health challenges, and vast systemic and educational disparities revealed from the switch to remote learning. More than 9 million students did not have access to broadband service or an internet-enabled device at the beginning of the pandemic, having no choice but to miss online school. And because the virus has disproportionately impacted communities of color, students of color have been disproportionately learning remotely. To promote digital equity in education, Brookings scholars propose a “No Child Left Offline” initiative. #covid-19 #education #racialequity #mentalhealth

Illinois announces $200 Million investment for early childhood workers

July 29, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

Illinois recently passed into law HB 2878, which uses $200 million in federal funds to provide training, mentorship programs, and scholarships for child care workers to pursue further education over the next two years. The bill also establishes a statewide early childhood education consortium to improve access and direct funding. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce #racialequity

Pathways to increasing vaccination uptake in Native communities

July 29, 2021 – General – COVID-19, Racial Equity, Vaccination

Longstanding inequities, community factors, and federal underinvestment in Native American public health has caused disproportionate harm to Native American communities throughout the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. In response, Native nations have undertaken effective vaccination campaigns, resulting in higher vaccination rates among Native populations than among other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. However, the remaining unvaccinated often report negative experiences with health care systems and concerns about the vaccine’s safety. New data from the American COVID-19 Vaccine Poll suggests messaging that can be effective messaging to address those concerns. #covid-19 #vaccination #racialequity

Federal stimulus checks kept 12.4 million people out of poverty in 2021

July 28, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Racial Equity

In an update to their work published earlier in 2021, Urban Institute researchers predict a poverty rate of 7.7 percent for 2021. The researchers incorporated into their model economic improvements, state-level pandemic policies, and expected employment and income levels, along safety net benefits like unemployment insurance, tax credits, state “back to work” bonuses, and federal and state stimulus checks to support this full picture of poverty in the United States. The work finds that the federal stimulus checks have had a larger antipoverty impact than any other program, alone keeping 12.4 million people out of poverty in 2021. #covid-19 #racialequity

Reducing the Black-white racial wealth gap will require dedicated and comprehensive policy solutions

July 28, 2021 – FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Education, Housing, Racial Equity, Wealth and Assets, Workforce

A new issue brief from the Center for American Progress examines the Black/white wealth gap and summarizes a set of proposals and policy actions to address the gap. Some recommendations include allowing the U.S. Postal Service to conduct banking services to increase community access; investing in research and development opportunities for Black innovators and inventors; dedicating additional funds for Black entrepreneurs; developing a National Savings Plan to provide retirement accounts to public sector workers; and investing in young children through childcare and education. #racialequity #childcare #education #housing #workforce #covid-19 #wealth&assets

How to stabilize infant and toddler care with pandemic relief funds

July 27, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Workforce

A new fieldnote published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston describes possibilities for using funds from the Child Care Stabilization portion of the American Rescue Plan Act to stabilize infant and toddler care. One option includes issuing grants to child care providers that could subsidize the operational cost of infant/toddler care to align the price with that of care for older children. Another option is creating grants to serve as incentives for attracting infant/toddler-serving professionals by offsetting the wage penalty typically present in that sector, in hopes of growing and stabilizing the workforce. Finally, the note suggests increasing child care subsidy rates beyond the 75th percentile of market rates for infant and toddler slots. #covid-19 #childcare #workforce