Resource Library

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The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources collected from reputable sources across the country. The library also includes briefs and reports the Foundation has commissioned or supported, a listing of which can be found here.

 

COVID-19: Racial and Geographic Disparities in Maine

February 14, 2022 – General – COVID-19, JTGF Funded, Racial Equity, Rural

Prepared for the John T. Gorman Foundation by the Carsey School of Public Policy in the fall of 2021, this analysis breaks down the economic, health, and social impacts of COVID-19 for different populations and regions across Maine, and highlights possible contributing factors between disparities.

Older workers leave labor force in pandemic, but maybe not for good

December 21, 2021 – SeniorsCOVID-19, Workforce

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College has published a new brief tracking changes in older adults’ labor force participation in the context of COVID-19. The authors report that the pandemic triggered labor force exits among older workers, with 15 percent of the pre-pandemic group exiting the workforce by the one-year mark. However, the brief also shows that there has been no increase in people specifically reporting being “retired” nor in Social Security benefit applications, suggesting that at least some of these workers may be planning an eventual workforce return.

Georgetown proposes holistic approach to youth policy in the transition to adulthood

December 7, 2021 – Older YouthEducation, Racial Equity, Workforce

Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce has published a new report describing how pandemic-era demand for workers intersects with the longer-term trend of a “deteriorating” labor market for young adults. The authors identify the “dot-com” bubble recession of 2001, the Great Recession, and the COVID-19 recession as discrete events in shaping youth employment prospects. Further, they note that longer-term economic shifts mean employers favor workers with greater technical knowledge and more experience over young workers. The paper also notes the racial-ethnic disparities in the share of young adults who are disconnected from work and school, at 12 percent for white youths age 16-21 and 17 percent for Black youths. To address the longrunning challenge, the authors propose an “all-in-one” system that builds a pipeline from pre-kindergarten to employment without silos. The authors suggest multiple strategies for creating the pipeline, including recognizing the complementary nature of classroom learning, occupational exploration, and work-based learning from kindergarten to college; or offering field trips and career days to children, apprenticeships and cooperative extension opportunities to high schoolers, and paid internships and enhanced work-study opportunities to college students, all in service of building a modern network for young adult success.

Pandemic brings lower rates of moving than ever before

November 30, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Housing

New analysis of Current Population Survey data shows that despite the pandemic-era narrative of people fleeing COVID-19 and becoming untethered from their physical worksites, just 8.4 percent of Americans moved houses in the past year, lower than in any of the prior 47 years for which data are available. This decline is part of longer-running trend beginning in the 1960s, in part due to the mobility-limiting factors of greater career connectedness among women and an aging population. The report cites high housing costs (including rentals), underemployment, and demographic stagnation as all contributing to the present mobility decline and warns of the potential for these larger forces to reduce the competitiveness of American housing and labor markets moving ahead.

Summary of early childhood educator convening focuses on racial, economic, and social justice

October 21, 2021 – Young Children, FamiliesChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity, Workforce

The Urban Institute recently published coverage of its January 2021 convening of early childhood education researchers, which focused on strengthening financial equity and workforce wellbeing among educators with a racial, economic, and social justice lens. The paper summarizes discussion and presentations from the event, concluding that the pandemic worsened conditions of pay and wellbeing for early educators in ways that reflect much longer-running conditions of structural racism. Focusing investment on home-based providers or infant/toddler educators—sectors in which women of color are disproportionately represented—could provide a pathway to addressing this gap.

Northeast Telehealth Resource Center receives grant to support rural Northeast health care providers with a virtual learning network

October 15, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Mental Health, Rural Workforce

A grant from the Health Resources and Service Administration is bringing an evidence-based community learning model to help rural health care providers support older Northeastern residents’ mental and physical health in the pandemic. The grant, awarded to the Northeast Telehealth Resource Center and the University of New Hampshire, will fund a five-year program called the Collaborative for Advancing Rural Excellence and Equity (CARE2). CARE2 will focus on connecting interdisciplinary health experts with community-based health care providers for mentorship, learning, and collaboration. With these supports in place, rural providers are better equipped to manage complex health conditions in their communities, including COVID variants, behavioral health issues, and substance use disorders. These supports are particularly important in consideration of the strains the health care workforce has faced during the pandemic.

Why We Can't Wait for A New Deal For Youth

August 20, 2021 – General – COVID-19, Education, Racial Equity

CLASP Center for Law and Policy has launched a New Deal for Youth. At a time of pandemic, recession, public lynchings, and uprisings for racial justice, our nation is at a crossroads. The mounting stress and economic fallout from COVID-19 and racial turmoil is widening the equity gap for young people and communities of color. Young people are leading in the face of these entrenched challenges and demanding to be seen and heard. We are in a crisis and need action and investment from the public and private sector to support solutions proposed for decades by young people and racial justice leaders. We can’t wait for economic justice. We can’t wait for healing and wellbeing. We can’t wait for safe communities. It is time for a New Deal for Youth that responds to the historic roots and current scale of the crisis. When the once-in-a-lifetime catastrophe is over, our future as a nation will depend on how intentionally we invest in this generation. #racialequity #education #covid-19

What does capping child care co-pays look like in each state?

August 18, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Racial Equity

A new resource published by CLASP provides a state-by-state analysis of the Child Care for Working Families Act’s sliding scale co-payment proposal. The act would cap out-of-pocket child care costs for families earning less than 150 percent of their state’s median income with co-pays varying across four levels. For instance, families earning less than 75 percent of median income would have zero co-pay, while families earning 125-150 percent would pay between 4 and 7 percent of their income. For Maine, this translates to free child care for families earning less than $61,888, and a maximum co-payment of $8,820 for Maine families earning up to $126,003. #covid-19 #childcare #racialequity

How COVID relief funds continue to feed one California county’s seniors

August 11, 2021 – SeniorsCOVID-19, Food Security

In response to the uptick in pandemic-related food insecurity, California Governor Gavin Newsom supported the “Great Plates” program in Spring 2020, which used federal funding to purchase and deliver local restaurant meals to seniors facing food insecurity. With the recent expiration of funds for that program, San Mateo County has decided to leverage its own COVID relief funds to continue a variation on the program through the next two fiscal years. #covid-19 #foodsecurity

Material hardship declines after Child Tax Credit payout

August 11, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Food Security

A new analysis of Household Pulse Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau finds that fewer households experienced trouble obtaining sufficient food and paying household expenses in the two-week period following the first Child Tax Credit advance payments began on July 15. Comparing reported food insufficiency rates between adults in households with children and those in households without, the analysis shows a 2.6 percentage point decline in food insufficiency among households with kids after the credit was issued, compared with no decline in households without children. Trouble paying expenses declined by 2.5 percentage points among households with children in this period, compared with a 1 percentage point increase in reported difficulty among households without children. #covid-19 #foodsecurity

Supporting immigrant children and families is critical in rebuilding the child care system and overall economy

August 11, 2021 – Families, Young ChildrenChildcare, COVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

CLASP recently published a brief outlining how immigrant providers and families can utilize the two child care funding streams made available in the American Rescue Plan Act: $24 billion in stabilization grants and another $15 billion for child care assistance through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Because immigrant families are a significant share of the nation’s families with children, and because immigrant workers comprise a substantial slice of child care providers, CLASP argues that excluding immigrant needs from planning processes risks leaving significant numbers of families and children behind. CLASP recommends that state agencies conduct outreach in immigrant communities to inform them about their eligibility for relief and to reduce fear and misunderstanding, support mental health services for immigrant workers and families, use funds to improve and coordinate state data systems, and be sure to bring the voices of immigrant communities into the decision-making process. #covid-19 #childcare #mentalhealth #racialequity

American Rescue Plan’s Fiscal Recovery Funds provide diverse support to those most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic

August 5, 2021 – FamiliesCOVID-19, Mental Health, Racial Equity

Early data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities show that the $350 billion in Fiscal Recovery Funds from the American Rescue Plan has helped states, localities, U.S. territories, and tribal governments invest in education, employment, emergency housing relief, mental health services, and broadband improvements. These investments vary in approach but include expanding and strengthening affordable housing and homelessness programs; youth mental health systems; workforce skills training; college scholarships and community college programs; alternatives to policing; services for immigrants; high-speed internet in rural areas; cash assistance and disability benefits; child care systems; food banks; and infrastructure in schools. In addition, the Fiscal Recovery Funds are helping avoid budget cuts to vulnerable areas. #covid-19 #racialequity #mentalhealth