Older Youth

Losing Our Minds: Brain Drain across the United States

Losing Our Minds: Brain Drain across the United States

The Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress has published a report on “brain drain” across the nation. For Maine specifically, the report finds that more highly-educated Mainers leave the state than stay behind, meaning that the state is experiencing gross brain drain, but at a lower rate than the rest of Northern New England. Maine fares better than New Hampshire and Vermont on net brain drain too: more highly educated adults are entering the state than are leaving it. Taken together, this means Maine is “disproportionately losing the best-educated adults born in-state… [but managing] to replace those leavers with better-educated entrants.” View Resource
Research-Based Instruments for Measuring Students' Soft Skills

Research-Based Instruments for Measuring Students' Soft Skills

The Research Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic at Mathematica Policy Research has published a new factsheet detailing evidence-based instruments that can be used to measure students’ soft skills. These skills (e.g., self-management, relationship skills) have been identified by educators and business leaders as key for students’ success in college or in the workforce. This toolkit of measures can be used by educators or others to identify youth strengths and weaknesses with the goal of improving long term outcomes. View Resource

Young Adults in the Parental Home, 2007-2018

Young Adults in the Parental Home, 2007-2018

New research from the National Center for Family & Marriage Research shows the
share of young adults (18-34) living in a parent’s home has increased by more than one quarter since 2007. While the share of 18- to 24-year-olds living with a parent peaked
in 2012, the share among older young adults (25-29 and 30-34) has continued to rise.

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Unsealed Fate: THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF INADEQUATE SAFEGUARDING OF JUVENILE RECORDS IN MAINE

Unsealed Fate: THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF INADEQUATE SAFEGUARDING OF JUVENILE RECORDS IN MAINE

Studies across the country are finding that limited safeguarding of juvenile records stemming from involvement in the juvenile justice system puts individuals at risk of facing collateral consequences, including difficulty obtaining employment and housing or serving in the military. This report explores the extent to which this issue is occurring in Maine by detailing what statutes say, what practices look like and what the implications are for individuals in Maine with a juvenile record. The goal of this report is to provide policy makers, the public and juvenile justice system practitioners with research about what those closest to the system understand about how records are handled and accessed, the impact of juvenile records and what improvements could be made that are consistent with the rehabilitative and public safety goals of the juvenile justice system in Maine. View Resource

Youth Recidivism Diversion to Discharge in Maine’s Juvenile Justice System

Youth Recidivism Diversion to Discharge in Maine’s Juvenile Justice System

For nearly two decades, Maine has used data to track, analyze, and report on youth involved in the juvenile justice system.  The goal of this research is to help assess the success of responses to system-involved youth by identifying which youth return to the justice system; to inform risk reduction efforts to benefit public safety; and to ensure that all Maine youth experience a fair, equitable, and responsive juvenile justice system that contributes to positive youth outcomes. 

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Positive Outcomes in Maine's Juvenile Justice System

Positive Outcomes in Maine's Juvenile Justice System

This report details the findings of positive youth outcomes as reported the exit reviews for the 174 youth leaving supervision of the Maine juvenile justice system between July 2017 and June 2018.“

Tracking positive youth outcomes for youth who pass through Maine’s justice system creates a more complete profile, beyond recidivism measures, of the resiliency and potential of this population. It also serves to highlight areas of strength where the system intervention is helping youth succeed, and point to areas where the system could offer youth more or different supports to facilitate their development in positive tracks.  
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Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Helping young people prepare to engage in work and life as productive adults is a central challenge for any society. Yet, many young people in the United States—particularly those from low-income or less educated families—find that the path to employment and economic security in adulthood is poorly marked or inaccessible.

Using an advanced methodology and longitudinal data, this report examines two main questions:

  • The quality of jobs (as measured by wages, benefits, hours, and job satisfaction) held by 29-year-olds who experienced disadvantage in adolescence
  • Whether particular employment, education, and training experiences in adolescence and early adulthood predict higher-quality jobs for 29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds

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Housing Stability Among First Place-Involved Youth

Housing Stability Among First Place-Involved Youth

The following brief on housing stability of youth experiencing homelessness or with prior experiences of homelessness in Portland, ME is the first in a series of briefs on the experiences of First Place program participants. The Evaluation of the First Place Program examined the experiences of 35 youth who accessed Preble Street’s First Place program between 2015 and 2018. The study included two core components: an implementation study and a qualitative youth study. The implementation study explored how the program was designed, implemented, and modified over time. The descriptive youth study examined youth characteristics and experiences in the following domains: housing, employment, education, risk behaviors, demographic characteristics, and social and emotional well-being. Program participants were interviewed at the time of program enrollment and again 12 months later to capture changes in youth experiences over the program period. View Resource
Who Was Poor in the United States in 2017?

Who Was Poor in the United States in 2017?

For the past few years, The Hamilton Project has released an annual report characterizing poverty in America. Describing who is poor is critical for making anti-poverty policy and directly relevant to determining eligibility for means-tested programs.

In 2017, 12.3 percent of the population—39.7 million people—lived in poverty, as defined by the official poverty measure [1]. The share of the population living in poverty was statistically significantly lower in 2017 than in 2016 by 0.4 percentage points. View Resource
The Tough Road From Foster Care To College

The Tough Road From Foster Care To College

College students often decamp from their universities during the summer to intern, study abroad or just get a break from dining hall food. But for Kayla Mayes, it’s a time to buckle down.

Her first semester at Western Michigan University, Mayes barely earned a 1.7 grade-point average. A class on the health effects of drug use felt overwhelming — “I wasn’t used to such long lectures,” she said — and pre-algebra was a struggle too. But good grades in reading and writing classes helped her finish the year with a 2.6 GPA and now she is hoping to lift it higher.

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Balancing Work and Learning

Balancing Work and Learning

It has gotten increasingly harder for students to work their way through college, especially for low-income students who face steep challenges when combining work and learning. Students from higher-income families tend to benefit as they work fewer hours in jobs directly related to their fields of study. Low-income working college students often work longer hours, and as a result, are less likely than their higher-income peers to get good grades and attain bachelor’s degrees or any credential at all. View Resource
Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care

Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care

For many decades, child welfare agencies, with few exceptions, only served children. State responsibility for the safety and well-being of youth in foster care ended at age 18 (or 19, at the state’s discretion, in the case of youth who were completing high school). In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act by giving states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. View Resource

From Adolescence to Adulthood: A Blueprint for Helping Maine’s Youth Succeed

From Adolescence to Adulthood: A Blueprint for Helping Maine’s Youth Succeed

All young people deserve an equal chance to be healthy, happy, safe, and nurtured as they transition from adolescence to adulthood. Unfortunately, not all young people in Maine have the essential support needed to successfully make this transition and reach their full potential. This report highlights the needs of an all too often hidden and underserved group of Maine’s young people. This group faces unique obstacles in the transition to adulthood because they are homeless or involved in the state’s foster care or juvenile justice systems. The report also shares some promising approaches underway in Maine that can be scaled up to help all young people succeed in school, at work, and in their relationships. Finally, it recommends how state leaders can act now to create better opportunities for young people and improve the odds that they can contribute to Maine’s future economic and civic success. View Resource
A Simpler Aid Application for Low-Income College Students

A Simpler Aid Application for Low-Income College Students

Policymakers, postsecondary education leaders, and researchers agree: the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) can be a barrier to achieving our nation’s college access goals. The sheer number of complicated and personal questions asked on the form can deter some students from going to college, or from receiving federal aid. Concerns about the FAFSA’s negative impact on enrollment and financial aid have sparked a bipartisan push to simplify and shorten the form by removing ‘unnecessary’ questions. View Resource
Juvenile Diversion Programs of Lewiston, Maine - Final Evaluation Report

Juvenile Diversion Programs of Lewiston, Maine - Final Evaluation Report

From January 2016 through June 2017, the John T.Gorman Foundation funded three organizations: Tree Street Youth, Inc., The Root Cellar, and Maine Immigrant Refugee Services to provide diversion services to youth in the juvenile justice system in Lewiston, Maine.

As part of the project, the Foundation contracted with Hornby Zeller Associates to conduct an evaluation of the programs to better understand the implementation process and the outcomes of the youth served during the course of the eighteen-month grant period.

This report details the findings from the evaluation and describes the characteristics of youth served, program implementation and activities conducted by the three programs, and the youth’s outcomes. View Resource
Evaluation of the Philadelphia GEAR UP Partnership Initiative

Evaluation of the Philadelphia GEAR UP Partnership Initiative

In September 2009, with funding from the US Department of Education, the School District of Philadelphia launched a seven-year Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant to help prepare low-income youth for success in college and careers. The initiative brought together a strong network of partners and schools committed to improving the educational outcomes of Philadelphia public school students in 26 middle schools and seven high schools.

From the start of the initiative, Metis partnered with the School District of Philadelphia to conduct an evaluation of the program’s implementation and outcomes. Through a mixed-methods evaluation, we continuously assessed the initiative’s progress towards its goals and objectives, and documented effective practices, challenges, and lessons learned from this important work. View Resource

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

In Maine, juvenile appeals are governed by the Maine Juvenile Code and the Maine Rules of Appellate Procedure. The Juvenile Code broadly dictates the types of rulings that a juvenile may appeal, and the Appellate Rules set out the details of how the appeal must proceed in the Law Court. View Resource
2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. View Resource
Closing the College Gap: A Roadmap to Postsecondary Readiness and Attainment

Closing the College Gap: A Roadmap to Postsecondary Readiness and Attainment

As the United States' advantage in educational attainment continues to decline, Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University joined together to release Closing the College Gap: A Roadmap to Postsecondary Readiness and Attainment. The report analyzes new longitudinal data to link the progress made in raising high school graduation rates to what is known about college readiness, access and persistence; the best indicators of a students’ postsecondary success; and the necessary and complementary roles that both the K-12 and higher education systems must play to raise educational attainments and close opportunity gaps. View Resource
Education Indicators for Maine

Education Indicators for Maine

The 2016 Education Indicators Report for Maine has been developed to explore and better understand Maine’s education pipeline from preschool through postsecondary education. The focus is on the 10 Indicators we have identified which we believe best measure Maine’s educational performance. The ten Indicators that we measure follow the path of each Maine child as he or she grows and learns. View Resource
Hidden in Plain Sight: Homeless Students in America’s Public Schools

Hidden in Plain Sight: Homeless Students in America’s Public Schools

Student homelessness is on the rise, with more than 1.3 million homeless students identified during the 2013-14 school year. This is a 7 percent increase from the previous year and more than double the number of homeless students in 2006-07. As high as these numbers seem, they are almost certainly undercounts. This study provides an overview of existing research on homeless students, sheds light on the challenges homeless students face and the supports they say they need to succeed, reports on the challenges adults – local liaisons and state coordinators – face in trying to help homeless students, and recommends changes in policy and practice at the school, community, state and national level to help homeless students get on a path to adult success. View Resource
What Works for Disconnected Young People

What Works for Disconnected Young People

Disconnected young people are the focus of several recent national initiatives to improve their life prospects. Drawing on interviews and available research, this MDRC Working Paper scans the current state of policy and evidence regarding what works in helping young people reconnect to work or school.
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Don't Call Them Dropouts: Understanding the Experiences of Young People Who Leave High School Before Graduation

Don't Call Them Dropouts: Understanding the Experiences of Young People Who Leave High School Before Graduation

The Center for Promise research team traveled across the country to investigate these initial research questions: What do young people say about why they leave high school before graduating? What circumstances surrounded the decision to leave? What were students' lives like when they left school, and what effects did leaving school have on them and their families? Why do young people say they come back to school? What opportunities do young people have to re-engage after leaving school, and what barriers do they encounter along the way? View Resource

Maine High School Graduates: Trends in College - Going, Persistence, and Completion

Maine High School Graduates: Trends in College - Going, Persistence, and Completion

In partnership with the Maine Department of Education and the National Student Clearinghouse, the Mitchell Institute distributes detailed reports on recent graduates’ college enrollment trends to all Maine public high schools. We also aggregate these data into state and regional estimates to provide context and inform policymakers and the public about these trends. View Resource
White House Paper on Opportunity Youth

White House Paper on Opportunity Youth

The White House Council for Community Solutions conducted extensive research and outreach to learn about community collaboration and pathways to employment for youth. On June 4, 2012 the Council presented its Final Report and Recommendations to the President via the White House Paper on Opportunity Youth. View Resource