Resources

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources.

We invite you to check back often, as we plan to regularly update the list below.

General Resources

Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

This graphic shows the share of Maine residents age 60 and older who live alone.

  • More than two of every five Maine seniors lives alone (41.3 percent).
  • Rates in Waldo County are lower than the statewide share, at 35.9 percent.
  • The share of seniors living alone is higher than the statewide estimate in Androscoggin and Knox Counties (44.9 percent and 45.7 percent, respectively).
View Resource
Developing a State Learning Agenda: The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Developing a State Learning Agenda: The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program supports voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. At the federal level, MIECHV has engaged in a strategic approach, the MIECHV Learning Agenda, to develop a portfolio of evidence about the implementation and impacts of MIECHV in multiple settings and contexts. The agenda includes a variety of activities, including performance measurement, continuous quality improvement (CQI), systematic reviews, descriptive research, and implementation and impact evaluation. States and territories receiving funding from MIECHV are encouraged to conduct rigorous state-led evaluations. State-led evaluations address questions of interest to the state and provide new insights on the scale-up and implementation of home visiting programs. MIECHV encourages state awardees to develop their own learning agendas to ensure that they use the best available evidence to improve performance. View Resource
Redesigning the Financial Roadmap for the LMI 50+ Segment

Redesigning the Financial Roadmap for the LMI 50+ Segment

For decades, the financial lives of Americans over the age of 50  were understood to follow a predictable lifecycle pattern. After working full-time into their early 60s, these individuals stopped working completely and began depending financially on a defined benefit pension plan. With a paid-off mortgage, comprehensive healthcare coverage, and reduced living expenses, they were free  to live frugally, but securely, in their retirement. View Resource

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Young Children

Developing a State Learning Agenda: The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Developing a State Learning Agenda: The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program supports voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. At the federal level, MIECHV has engaged in a strategic approach, the MIECHV Learning Agenda, to develop a portfolio of evidence about the implementation and impacts of MIECHV in multiple settings and contexts. The agenda includes a variety of activities, including performance measurement, continuous quality improvement (CQI), systematic reviews, descriptive research, and implementation and impact evaluation. States and territories receiving funding from MIECHV are encouraged to conduct rigorous state-led evaluations. State-led evaluations address questions of interest to the state and provide new insights on the scale-up and implementation of home visiting programs. MIECHV encourages state awardees to develop their own learning agendas to ensure that they use the best available evidence to improve performance. View Resource
Overdue for Investment: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2018

Overdue for Investment: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2018

Child care is crucial for the well-being of parents, children, and our nation. It makes it possible for parents to work and support their families. It gives children a safe, nurturing environment to learn and develop skills they need to succeed in school and in life. And, by strengthening the current and future workforce, it bolsters our nation’s economy. Yet many families, particularly low-income families, struggle with the high cost of child care. These costs can strain families’ budgets, force parents to use lower-cost care even if they would prefer other options for their children, or prevent parents from working because they cannot afford care. Child care assistance can enable families to overcome these challenges by helping families pay for child care. View Resource

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Older Youth

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Helping young people prepare to engage in work and life as productive adults is a central challenge for any society. Yet, many young people in the United States—particularly those from low-income or less educated families—find that the path to employment and economic security in adulthood is poorly marked or inaccessible.

Using an advanced methodology and longitudinal data, this report examines two main questions:

  • The quality of jobs (as measured by wages, benefits, hours, and job satisfaction) held by 29-year-olds who experienced disadvantage in adolescence
  • Whether particular employment, education, and training experiences in adolescence and early adulthood predict higher-quality jobs for 29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds

  View Resource

Housing Stability Among First Place-Involved Youth

Housing Stability Among First Place-Involved Youth

The following brief on housing stability of youth experiencing homelessness or with prior experiences of homelessness in Portland, ME is the first in a series of briefs on the experiences of First Place program participants. The Evaluation of the First Place Program examined the experiences of 35 youth who accessed Preble Street’s First Place program between 2015 and 2018. The study included two core components: an implementation study and a qualitative youth study. The implementation study explored how the program was designed, implemented, and modified over time. The descriptive youth study examined youth characteristics and experiences in the following domains: housing, employment, education, risk behaviors, demographic characteristics, and social and emotional well-being. Program participants were interviewed at the time of program enrollment and again 12 months later to capture changes in youth experiences over the program period. View Resource
Who Was Poor in the United States in 2017?

Who Was Poor in the United States in 2017?

For the past few years, The Hamilton Project has released an annual report characterizing poverty in America. Describing who is poor is critical for making anti-poverty policy and directly relevant to determining eligibility for means-tested programs.

In 2017, 12.3 percent of the population—39.7 million people—lived in poverty, as defined by the official poverty measure [1]. The share of the population living in poverty was statistically significantly lower in 2017 than in 2016 by 0.4 percentage points. View Resource

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Families

Social Service Delivery in Two Rural Counties

Social Service Delivery in Two Rural Counties

When low-income residents struggle to make ends meet, non-profit social service agencies can help fill the gaps. In doing so, these agencies must find sufficient funding, retain qualified staff, and craft efficient service delivery mechanisms that are respectful of clients and communities. Some of the challenges that service providers encounter are exacerbated by rural characteristics, such as vast geographic distances and the lack of economies of scale. Yet in some ways rurality is beneficial, as small communities can facilitate community engagement and providers can engage natural supports in their service delivery work. View Resource
Maine Data Glimpse: Family Poverty in Maine by Family Type, 2012-2016

Maine Data Glimpse: Family Poverty in Maine by Family Type, 2012-2016

This figure displays the poverty rates for Maine families by county and family type.

  • Across all counties, single mother poverty is about six times as high as among married couple families.
  • Single father poverty rates are similar to married parent poverty rates across all counties, speaking to the disparities in mothers’ and fathers’ incomes.
View Resource

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Seniors

Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

This graphic shows the share of Maine residents age 60 and older who live alone.

  • More than two of every five Maine seniors lives alone (41.3 percent).
  • Rates in Waldo County are lower than the statewide share, at 35.9 percent.
  • The share of seniors living alone is higher than the statewide estimate in Androscoggin and Knox Counties (44.9 percent and 45.7 percent, respectively).
View Resource
Redesigning the Financial Roadmap for the LMI 50+ Segment

Redesigning the Financial Roadmap for the LMI 50+ Segment

For decades, the financial lives of Americans over the age of 50  were understood to follow a predictable lifecycle pattern. After working full-time into their early 60s, these individuals stopped working completely and began depending financially on a defined benefit pension plan. With a paid-off mortgage, comprehensive healthcare coverage, and reduced living expenses, they were free  to live frugally, but securely, in their retirement. View Resource

An Invisible Tsunami: ‘Aging Alone’ and Its Effect on Older Americans, Families, and Taxpayers

An Invisible Tsunami: ‘Aging Alone’ and Its Effect on Older Americans, Families, and Taxpayers

Social capital may be most valuable when an individual’s needs are greatest. Old age is a time of life when people often need to rely on family, friends, and other social relationships for care they are no longer able to provide for themselves. If an elderly adult lacks those relationships, however, they may have to lean more heavily on paid professional care, potentially leading to a lower quality of life and higher costs for families and government. View Resource

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