Resources

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources.

We invite you to check back often, as we plan to regularly update the list below.

General Resources

Data Glimpse: Maine Population Change 2010-2018

Data Glimpse: Maine Population Change 2010-2018

Maine’s population change has been sporadic since 2010, due to irregular influxes of migrants. However, the pace at which Maine deaths are outpacing births is increasing over time.The population of Maine increased by about 10,000 people between 2010 and 2018. The majority of Maine’s 2010-2018 population increase was due to migration, with more than 18,000 net migrants into the state (56 percent international). Deaths outpaced births during this period in the state by more than 7,400. View Resource
Improving ACA Subsidies for Low- and Moderate-Income Consumers Is Key to Increasing Coverage

Improving ACA Subsidies for Low- and Moderate-Income Consumers Is Key to Increasing Coverage

A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) posits that the
key to increasing health insurance coverage is to expand subsidies offered through the
Affordable Care Act. Although cost is the main barrier to coverage for uninsured
populations, the majority of the uninsured have low incomes and are eligible for ACA
marketplace options. CBPP suggests that costs of expanded subsidies could be met by
scaling back the tax cuts from the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

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The Poverty-Reducing Effect of Five Key Government Programs in Rural and Urban America

The Poverty-Reducing Effect of Five Key Government Programs in Rural and Urban America

Federal programs are critical for helping those with low incomes make ends meet. But not all such programs are equally effective at reducing poverty, nor do they benefit all of those in poverty uniformly. In this brief, we explore the extent to which rural and urban residents access five social programs—Social Security, disability benefits, federal and state cash assistance, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)— and the effect of these programs individually and collectively in bringing family incomes closer to the poverty threshold. View Resource

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Young Children

A More Diverse Teaching Force May Improve Educational Outcomes for Minority Students (Infographic)

A More Diverse Teaching Force May Improve Educational Outcomes for Minority Students (Infographic)

Mathematica released a research infographic suggesting that greater diversity among teachers may improve minority students’ educational outcomes. The research finds that “most minority students are not taught by teachers of the same race and ethnicity” and that while the student body is diversifying quickly, teacher demographics are not keeping pace. The authors conclude that while it’s not clear why matching race-ethnicity drives better outcomes for students, cultural relevance and positive role modeling may play a role. View Resource
Neighborhood Qualities and Parenting Among Mothers With Young Children

Neighborhood Qualities and Parenting Among Mothers With Young Children

A study in the Journal of Family Issues explored the associations between neighborhood social processes (e.g., social disorder) and parenting qualities among mothers of children age 2-4. Higher levels of positive neighborhood characteristics were associated with reduced parenting stress and higher positive parenting qualities for all mothers, but neighborhood social processes were especially impactful for single mothers. The author suggests that enhancing neighborhood supports can be helpful for promoting healthier parenting across multiple dimensions, particularly for single mothers. View Resource

Inequitable Access to Child Care Subsidies

Inequitable Access to Child Care Subsidies

A new analysis from CLASP explores how access to child care subsidies varies by state and race-ethnicity. The report finds that only 8 percent of potentially eligible children received subsidies in 2016, with especially high rates of access among black children (15 percent) and especially low rates among Asian children (3 percent). Access by state ranged from 15 percent in New Mexico to 3 percent in the District of Columbia (Maine was among 13 states excluded from the analysis due to data quality issues). The authors concluded that improving data collection and better understanding the causes of racialethnic stratification in access should be next steps. View Resource

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Older Youth

Losing Our Minds: Brain Drain across the United States

Losing Our Minds: Brain Drain across the United States

The Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress has published a report on “brain drain” across the nation. For Maine specifically, the report finds that more highly-educated Mainers leave the state than stay behind, meaning that the state is experiencing gross brain drain, but at a lower rate than the rest of Northern New England. Maine fares better than New Hampshire and Vermont on net brain drain too: more highly educated adults are entering the state than are leaving it. Taken together, this means Maine is “disproportionately losing the best-educated adults born in-state… [but managing] to replace those leavers with better-educated entrants.” View Resource
Research-Based Instruments for Measuring Students' Soft Skills

Research-Based Instruments for Measuring Students' Soft Skills

The Research Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic at Mathematica Policy Research has published a new factsheet detailing evidence-based instruments that can be used to measure students’ soft skills. These skills (e.g., self-management, relationship skills) have been identified by educators and business leaders as key for students’ success in college or in the workforce. This toolkit of measures can be used by educators or others to identify youth strengths and weaknesses with the goal of improving long term outcomes. View Resource

Young Adults in the Parental Home, 2007-2018

Young Adults in the Parental Home, 2007-2018

New research from the National Center for Family & Marriage Research shows the
share of young adults (18-34) living in a parent’s home has increased by more than one quarter since 2007. While the share of 18- to 24-year-olds living with a parent peaked
in 2012, the share among older young adults (25-29 and 30-34) has continued to rise.

  View Resource

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Families

Neighborhood Qualities and Parenting Among Mothers With Young Children

Neighborhood Qualities and Parenting Among Mothers With Young Children

A study in the Journal of Family Issues explored the associations between neighborhood social processes (e.g., social disorder) and parenting qualities among mothers of children age 2-4. Higher levels of positive neighborhood characteristics were associated with reduced parenting stress and higher positive parenting qualities for all mothers, but neighborhood social processes were especially impactful for single mothers. The author suggests that enhancing neighborhood supports can be helpful for promoting healthier parenting across multiple dimensions, particularly for single mothers. View Resource

Family Resilience And Connection Promote Flourishing Among US Children, Even Amid Adversity

Family Resilience And Connection Promote Flourishing Among US Children, Even Amid Adversity

A new article in Health Affairs explored the concept of “flourishing” among US children age 6-17, measured with indicators on curiosity, persistence, and regulating emotions. The authors found that 40 percent of US children are flourishing, and that across levels of adverse childhood experiences, household income, and special health care needs, children were more likely flourish when levels of family resilience and connection were high. The article also estimates prevalence of flourishing for each state, finding that Maine’s rate (35.7 percent) was significantly lower than nationwide.

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What it would take to achieve quality jobs for all workers?

What it would take to achieve quality jobs for all workers?

The Urban Institute published a detailed report exploring “What would it take to achieve quality jobs for all workers?” Based on interviews, focus groups, and round tables with key stakeholders, the report identifies required actions from an array of business, policy, private players, including legislators, employers, industries, nonprofit agencies, and workers themselves. The report concludes with a list of priorities for better understanding how to improve job quality, including gathering additional data on non-standard work—a key area in which job quality may need to be improved.

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Seniors

Challenges Facing Older Adults in the U.S.

Challenges Facing Older Adults in the U.S.

A trio of articles published ahead of print in Health Affairs focuses on challenges facing older adults in the United States. Rowe provides an overview of policies and initiatives that seek to expand seniors’ access to health care, housing, and economic security. Herbert and Molinsky call for additional services and supports that would allow older adults to age successfully at home, including crafting new housing options, expanding financial support to appropriately retrofit existing homes, and improving delivery of inhome support services. Pearson et al. explore the adequacy of long-term care and housing needs for middle-income seniors, finding that 54 percent of seniors do not have sufficient financial resources to meet these needs. The forthcoming issue is broadly focused on elder care.

Rowe: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2019.00095;

Herbert and Molinsky: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2019.00203;

Pearson et al.: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2018.05233;
April 24, 2019 View Resource

The Poverty-Reducing Effect of Five Key Government Programs in Rural and Urban America

The Poverty-Reducing Effect of Five Key Government Programs in Rural and Urban America

Federal programs are critical for helping those with low incomes make ends meet. But not all such programs are equally effective at reducing poverty, nor do they benefit all of those in poverty uniformly. In this brief, we explore the extent to which rural and urban residents access five social programs—Social Security, disability benefits, federal and state cash assistance, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)— and the effect of these programs individually and collectively in bringing family incomes closer to the poverty threshold. View Resource
Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

Maine Data Glimpse: Share of Householders Age 60+ Living Alone

This graphic shows the share of Maine residents age 60 and older who live alone.

  • More than two of every five Maine seniors lives alone (41.3 percent).
  • Rates in Waldo County are lower than the statewide share, at 35.9 percent.
  • The share of seniors living alone is higher than the statewide estimate in Androscoggin and Knox Counties (44.9 percent and 45.7 percent, respectively).
View Resource

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