Resources

The John T. Gorman Foundation strives to be data-driven and results based and seeks to promote information and ideas that advance greater understanding of issues related to our mission and priorities. In our effort to promote these values, we offer these research and best practice resources.

We invite you to check back often, as we plan to regularly update the list below.

General Resources

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. View Resource
Measures of Growth 2017

Measures of Growth 2017

The Maine Economic Growth Council and Maine Development Foundation are pleased to present Measures of Growth 2017, the 23rd annual report on the key indicators that measures Maine’s progress toward long-term economic growth and a high quality of life for all Maine people. View Resource

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Young Children

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. View Resource
Toward a More Equal Footing: Early Head Start in Maine

Toward a More Equal Footing: Early Head Start in Maine

One program that connects the most economically vulnerable families with quality early childhood programming is Early Head Start (EHS). Subject to rigorous quality and staffing standards, implemented among the youngest children (prenatally through age 2), and delivered via a two-generation approach, EHS is a significant opportunity for providing quality care and education to a population that might otherwise struggle to access it. This brief explores the characteristics of EHS in Maine, compares them to the national landscape, and connects these findings to a discussion of the federal and state policy climates. View Resource

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Older Youth

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

A Guide to Juvenile Appellate Practice in Maine

In Maine, juvenile appeals are governed by the Maine Juvenile Code and the Maine Rules of Appellate Procedure. The Juvenile Code broadly dictates the types of rulings that a juvenile may appeal, and the Appellate Rules set out the details of how the appeal must proceed in the Law Court. View Resource
2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. View Resource

View all Older Youth Resources

Families

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 Maine KIDS COUNT Data Book

The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. View Resource
Measures of Growth 2017

Measures of Growth 2017

The Maine Economic Growth Council and Maine Development Foundation are pleased to present Measures of Growth 2017, the 23rd annual report on the key indicators that measures Maine’s progress toward long-term economic growth and a high quality of life for all Maine people. View Resource
Children and Families at the Center

Children and Families at the Center

In this shifting landscape, it is urgent that we articulate and advance a concrete agenda for children and families that leaders can embrace at the community, state, and national levels. Both political parties agree: Investing in children and families yields major returns, including safer communities, a more educated workforce, and a stable economy. We have an opportunity to build on this common ground and shared commitment while holding our systems accountable for ensuring positive outcomes for children, families, and communities. View Resource

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Seniors

Healthy Aging Begins at Home

Healthy Aging Begins at Home

Over the next 15 years, the explosive growth of the nation’s senior population will present unprecedented challenges. Unfortunately, millions of Americans will find they lack enough savings to fund their retirements. Some will struggle to afford their housing, while others will find their housing is ill-suited for living independently. Many will eventually need help with the “activities of daily living,” like eating, bathing, and dressing, assistance that can be both costly and taxing on other family members. Most older Americans will suffer from at least one chronic condition. View Resource

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